toilet flushing leak

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by vertigodj, 26 Sep 2006.

This topic originated from the How to page called Clearing a blocked WC.

  1. vertigodj

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    when i flush my toilet i get water leaking between the cistern and where it joins the pan,is there a rubber seal that would need replacig in there-toilet approx 20 years old ?
     
  2. RigidRaider

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    Sir! Sir! Can I answer this one? I know the answer...!

    Turn off the mains, remove the cistern and you'll find a big rubber doughnut between cistern and WC, which has perished and collapsed.

    Don't attempt to do this on a Saturday afternoon though as something is bound to go wrong. Do it on a weekday morning and it will run smooth because there's time to go to the plumber's merchant. So nothing will go wrong.
     
  3. Nige F

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    stupid boy :rolleyes: ;)
     
  4. tincup

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  5. srahim

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    Given that Boiler regulations are constantly updated and strict guidelines introduced. Why i wonder are bottom entry WC Cisterns made with multiple holes which are prone to leaking with the pressure of water entering from bottom. I think that a regulation needs to enforce a ban on all cisterns with coupling holes through them

    I have checked the forums and many people including myself had considerable nightmare with the coupling bolts which go through the cistern then WC pan to leak (either due to the bolts or large 'doughnut washer'

    tried many things such as silicone/ rubber washers and tightening wing nuts but small leak through right hand hole.
     
  6. mogget

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    If you put them together properly they don't leak!
     
  7. wingcoax

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    Didn't they make cisterns with through holes many years ago? Then adaptor kits to fit later pans. All the latest pottery has a plate under the cistern to connect to the pan so no through holes to leak.
     
  8. mogget

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    I've fitted two recently which both had through-holes. They were cheapy diy shed specials though.
     
  9. srahim

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    I had initially replaced the flush handle and old syphon for a 'flapper' type one and as per many posts by others, I found that the 'doughnut washer' which I had purchased with the additional coupling metal plate and small coach bolts was too large for the particular cistern/ pan and hence I reused the old doughnut washer which was fine until approx a week later when noticing small bluish water drops on the lino from the coupling nut holes, I had thought that it was the coupling nuts and dismantled the cistern retightened and assembled, all ok for 2 days and then leak again. So by now quite fedup, then upon checking forum ideas I attempted to get another doughnut washer and this was a snug fit and I did have to wedge in the cistern into the pan to get a reasonable fit. This was fitted today and lets see if any improvement.

    On the note about the 'cheepy cisterns' I don't understand why they still produce them and sell them normally at a discounted price - as surely it must be more tricky to produce these cisterns anyway - so why not just make the standard one water inlet hole and hole for the flush water to discharge - omitting coupling nut holes and overflow pipe hole as nowadays seen most products with internal overflow.
     

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