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types of bricks

Discussion in 'Building' started by briwire, 10 May 2008.

  1. briwire

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    I'm preparing to build a small garden wall. Nothing major, but I'm puzzled by the different type of bricks available.

    I've had a walk round a few builders merchants and seen Engineering bricks which are smooth on all sides. Are these used where they can't be seen for cheapness?

    I want to use ones similar to those on the house which have a texture to them.

    Anyone got a brief description of each type of brick and where they should be used?
     
  2. noseall

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    i don't know what it is in the manufacturing process that makes one particular brick cost more than another to produce.

    red engineering bricks are produced in their millions so are obviously less expensive. staffy blues are also an engineering brick but cost a lot more.

    L.B.C. bricks are tat and very porous but cost a bomb. these are practically useless in a garden wall.

    some bricks readily absorb water where others don't

    an engineering brick for example is rather hard and non porous so is ideal for below dpc, close to the ground and for finishing off (coping brick) a garden wall. or anywhere that is exposed to a lot of moisture or water.

    so, you want a hard brick close to the ground and a hard brick to finish off. i guess you can use what you like in between.

    i would not recommend anything that is particularly porous for a garden wall, particularly if it were retaining.

    harder bricks are more difficult to lay in cold wet weather and very porous bricks are difficult to lay in warm dry weather. those with moderate suction i.e. a London brick (l.b.c.) are a piece of cake to lay in whatever conditions. ;)
     
  3. briwire

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    If I'm building a double thickness garden wall, is it the done thing to use a hard engineering brick on the retaining surface where there will be constant wet soil in contact with it, and a decorative outer where it will be seen?

    I want something reddish with a textured finish, similar to the house. I've had a look on B&Q, and they do one called Hartshill red, which looks similar to what I am after.
     
  4. tawelfryn

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    Agree with everything you say Noseall, but LBC's are murder in hot sunny conditions, you have to be quick with the jointing, otherwise they are terrible to joint, worth soaking them down with water before laying when its warm

     
  5. noseall

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    aah, but tawelfyn - are you a frog up or a frog down kinda guy. :LOL:

    frog up allows for a decent volume of muck and helps with all that suction. i agree, they are in the upper bracket of suction and do need a good dousing in the summer. ;)

    there are worse though....
     

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