wbp ply bathroom floor???

Discussion in 'Tiling' started by paul78, 13 Feb 2011.

  1. xr4x4

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    Osb is normally coated with a waterproof layer.

    Stuff I buy does anyway.

    Edit.

    Why does ply need to be boil proof anyway?
     
  2. JohnD

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    Builders Merchants don't usually cut board to your preferred size, but DIY sheds often do. When I had some 18mm WBP flooring laid last year (got a good deal at Wickes) they don't cut it, but we collected it in the van and I got the joiner to cut it into 8' x 2' peces which were reasonably easy to carry upstairs and sling around. If you are a bit weedy I think you will find 4' x 2' pieces even easier. With careful measurement you will have very little extra cutting to do on site. Longer pieces are more rigid and less likely to need noggins. If it's a bathroom you can probably have it cut into pieces to fit the width. A DIY shed is often, but not always, more expensive than a timber yard.

    It is easier to fit if you remove the skirting first so any uneven edges will be hidden afterwards.

    A jig saw is very slow and will go blunt unless you buy TCT blades.

    WBP (Water and Boil-Proof) ply is just very water resistant. When it was introduced, the makers used to have it in exhibitions with a piece immersed in a tub of boiling water to show how good it was (the old casein ply would have fallen apart)
     
  3. Tully

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    thanks john but is CE 0407CPD 436 2x EN636 2 EN314 2 Ext E2 ply okay for the job ?
     
  4. Tully

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    thanks john but is CE 0407CPD 436 2x EN636 2 EN314 2 Ext E2 ply okay for the job ?
     
  5. JohnD

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  6. Richard C

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    Personally I would advise you use only exterior grade EN 636-3, EN 636-2 is only moisture resistant.

    When tiling or re-tiling, there are many things that can catch you out. With walls, you need to consider tile weights, prep & materials &, as you’re discovering. suspended timber floors need special consideration if you want to avoid early tile failure. I would advise you read the Tiling Sticky & Forum Archive posts before doing any more work or buying materials, it could prevent you making disastrous & potentially expensive mistakes. It’s also important to use only quality trade tilling materials of the correct type for your tiles & tile base; cheapo own brand & DIY stuff is mostly crap.
     
  7. JohnD

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    Ah, that's useful to know! What's the difference in how it's made?

    edited:
    found it now

    http://www.tradewood.co.uk/media/c345d690feca47abb74ee560931b1ecbPlywood Standards.pdf

    you are recommending the EN 636-3 because it is a bathroom and liable to get repeatedly wet. And the old "WBP" descriptor seems to be out of date. Shame because it's so easy to understand and remember :cry:
     
  8. Richard C

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    Exactly; I still use “WBP” as I think it’s more meaningful to most folks than EN speak :confused: . The adhesive spec is also important for the tiling process which, in itself, involves using water based materials, you may get away with EN 636-2 but I think it’s better to be safe than sorry when tiling as failure can be very expensive. :cry:
     

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