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Concrete corner-post problem

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dougalthedog

from United Kingdom

Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 6
Location: Suffolk,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 4:27 pm Reply with quote

I have a closeboard fence at the bottom of the garden that was made using slotted and morticed concrete posts that take 3 arris rails.

I now want to replicate this fence up the left hand side of the garden and so join with the existing fence at 90 degrees.

The problem I have is that the existing fence was errected with an intermediate post at the point where the 2 fences will join. I have been told that a corner post should have been used but as it wasn't I would like to know is anyone has any better ideas than digging up and replacing the existing post.
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WabbitPoo

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 8:16 pm Reply with quote

nope
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Thermo

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 8:58 pm Reply with quote

cut the mortces yourself, easy to do. mark them out then cut most away ith a larger drill bit, then clean up with a sharp chisel. It should cut failry easily, if you can only go so deep then shorten the end on the arris rail to suit. i often have to do it as not all fences are that staright forward.
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dougalthedog

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:30 am Reply with quote

Thank you for your most helpful suggestion. I have an old cracked post that I will practice on first
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:39 am Reply with quote

Thermo wrote:
cut the mortices yourself, easy to do. .


?on a reinforced concrete post?
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Thermo

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 2:24 pm Reply with quote

Doh, sorry dont try this at home. try reading the bloody post properly first....missed the concrete bit! icon_rolleyes.gif Still if you do manage to do it can you post some pictures! icon_lol.gif

please refer back to wabbitpoos answer! icon_lol.gif
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masona

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 3:23 pm Reply with quote

If I'm reading right, can you not put in a timber on the opposite side of the slot and with screws from the fence panel side, most of the concrete have screw holes then the arris rail fix to the timber at the back or is the answer still nope icon_lol.gif
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dougalthedog

from United Kingdom

Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 6
Location: Suffolk,
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 9:45 pm Reply with quote

I had thought about drilling 2 or 3 holes into the existing concrete post and rawlbolting on a timber cut with a slot and mortices.
Has anyone got an opinion on this plan bearing in mind I only have a bog-standard 240v hammer drill
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ModernMaterials

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:50 pm Reply with quote

Could you screw thick noggins of timber on to the concrete corner post and then screw the arris rails on to the noggins?

Or even better, could you find some chunky L shaped aluminium and use that instead of noggins?
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nnikjo

from United Kingdom

Joined: 29 Apr 2008
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Location: Essex,
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:02 pm Reply with quote

make it easy on yourself and just dig up the old post and replace with the correct type of post it will save you trouble in the long run.rawl plug and drilling is liable to split the post
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breezer

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:36 pm Reply with quote

nnikjo, may i suggest you read the date before you post, he has probably done it now since has asked back in 2007

forum rule 8
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