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Help - Induction hob confusion

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EggMella

from United Kingdom

Joined: 12 Feb 2009
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Location: London,
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 4:42 pm Reply with quote

All,

I'm about to purchase a new induction hob but as I was browsing through the various models I noticed one shop had a description against all its induction hobs stating "Please note: Induction hobs cannot be placed above built-under double ovens".

This seems a bit generalized and rather limited but given that I have a built-under double oven I'm now wondering whether splashing out on an induction hob is a bad idea.

Does anyone have experience of fitting these things? Is this description accurate and does it apply in all cases?
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RF Lighting

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 5:16 pm Reply with quote

Yes.

If an electrician installs a piece of equipment in direct contradiction to the manufacturers instructions, then it does not comply with BS7671, part P of the building regulations, and therefor could never be signed off as being a safe installation.

There must be a reason for them saying this. I'm sure they wouldn't just make it up for fun.
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Steve

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 5:25 pm Reply with quote

Maybe its heat. Induction hobs dont get hot, and contain quite sensitive parts, perhaps sensitive to heat?
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Taylortwocities

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 5:39 pm Reply with quote

Modern ovens usually have all the nice digital clock and timer stuff at the top.

an induction-cooker is a powerful, high-frequency electromagnet.

When you turn on the hob you will probably induce large amounts of stuff into the innerds of the oven

And they dont like it up em, Mr Mannering!
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EggMella

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 6:18 pm Reply with quote

Ok. I probably left some important information out/unclear.

The website stating this isn't the manufacturers site and I can't find the same statement on the manufacturers site.

Also they say this with refrence to built-under double ovens but don't mention built-in. So I would expect the statement about the built in electrics to be off base?
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Steve

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 6:20 pm Reply with quote

Built under = under a hob.

Built in = in a tall standing unit at eye level. Try using a hob on top of that.
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earlkitchener

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 6:31 pm Reply with quote

Could be due to the thickness of the hob, you will prob be OK with 38mm w/top, but not with 27mm, as long as there is 8-10mm space between oven and hob it should be OK
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EggMella

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Location: London,
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 7:30 pm Reply with quote

earlkitchener wrote:
Could be due to the thickness of the hob, you will prob be OK with 38mm w/top, but not with 27mm, as long as there is 8-10mm space between oven and hob it should be OK


Just reviewed the installation manual for the product in question. It says absolutely nothing about built-under double ovens or built-in for that matter (but as pointed out by Steve I don't really want to be cooking on a ladder anyway).

The only thing I can find that might be relevant is that it appears to require a 5mm gap between the worktop it's mounted on and whatever resides underneath. However, this is shown in a graphic so I'm not 100% clear on whether that is what they are asking.... I'll see if anyone has a more definitive answer and failing that ask the manufacturer.

cheers
Eggers
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DJM

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2009 11:11 pm Reply with quote

We have recently had a large (900mm) induction hob fitted over built under ovens. The hob installation states that this type of installation requires a minimum thickness of worktop and a minimum gap between the bottom of the hob and the top of the oven. Our ovens are single and positioned side by side.
It might be the fact that a double built under oven is taller and would not allow for a sufficient air gap between the bottom of the hob and top of the oven.
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EggMella

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2009 7:15 am Reply with quote

Great, do you know what clearance was required?

Eggers
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flameport

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2009 1:01 pm Reply with quote

In the instruction book, the 5mm clearance is the gap between the worktop lower edge and the top of the door / drawer underneath. This is probably for ventilation.
The book also shows removing the crossmember from the front top of the base cabinet. (page 27) to create this gap.

Page 28 shows the clearance between the bottom of the hob and whatever is underneath - minimum 20mm.
The worktop must be at least 25mm thick.

A double oven is not likely to fit underneath, as it will be the full height of the cabinet.
Double ovens underneath a worktop are useless anyway, as you will have to grovel on the floor to see in the bottom oven.
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Richard1

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2009 6:31 pm Reply with quote

This is normally because most induction hobs have a depth of 50-55mm
and with a double oven the height of the oven compared to the unit frontage height is very tight for space, and depending on whose kitchen units you have the oven may need to be dropped down 20-25mm, some double ovens are supported by a metal leg frame that prevent this. Also ventilation and heat dispersal is via the gap between hob and oven and this clearance MUST be maintained.
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mike1408

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 13, 2009 11:57 am Reply with quote

I know this is an old topic but I've only just joined! I bought and fitted a Candy induction hob but it was badly affected by heat from the conventional single oven beneath. If the oven was on, the heating zones would signal that they were too hot (and unavailable for cooking) even before any attempt was made to use them. Comet service engineers confirmed that the installation was correct (plenty of space for ventilation) and had no explanation for the effect other than confirming the problem and, eventually, authorising a return for refund.

I tried to find out why and how it could be a problem to install an induction hob in such an obvious place but everybody just said 'it shouldn't be a problem' or, in the case of Candy themselves, 'we don't have anyone who knows'!
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The following user says thank you to mike1408 for this useful post:
holmslaw (8 Oct 2009)
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viewer

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 13, 2009 12:33 pm Reply with quote

The induction unit electronics monitor their own temperature. Microchips don't likr to be too hot. If the system senses that the chip is above a certain temperature it will protect it by giving an error and not working. The same system keeps the fan on after use when necessary.
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flameport

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 13, 2009 12:40 pm Reply with quote

A cooking appliance which ceases to function when it heats up.

What an outstandingly poor design. Just adding to the evidence that induction hobs are useless.
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