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Damp proofing a cellar


 
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mat59

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Apr 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Kent,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 7:40 pm Reply with quote

Hi everyone. I've been reseraching how to damp proof my cellar to use it for storage.

I am looking for some advice on how to do this. I'm looking to do it cheaply and as the cellar is not very damp I was hoping to apply a damp proof paint rather than using a plastic membranne and sump.

The cellar is damp but not excessively. My next door neighbour has successfully damp proofed his cellar (used as a hobby room) using Johnstones damp proof paint http://www.decoratingwarehouse.co.uk/catalogue.php?productid=104

I was thinking of using a black bitumen paint -http://www.wickes.co.uk/Liquid-Damp-Proofing/Liquid-Damp-Proof-Membrane/invt/241217 - and eventually painting over this with a white paint.

I've tried using some of the bitumen paint on the walls with poor results. I've brushed the walls down but the paint does not adhere to the pointing between the bricks as it is still dusty and crumbly.

A local builder advised me that I should use PVA paint as this will stop the surface from crumbling. I presume I could use PVA and then bitumen paint over the top?

Any advice on what to do would be much apprecited.

Thanks,

Matt
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freddymercurystwin

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Joined: 21 Jan 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 8:18 pm Reply with quote

If your neighbours been successful using the Johnstones stuff why not just use that?
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mat59

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Apr 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Kent,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 9:23 pm Reply with quote

freddymercurystwin wrote:
If your neighbours been successful using the Johnstones stuff why not just use that?


Hi. The Johnstones stuff is expensive. The bitumen stuff should do the job, it's just difficult getting it to adhere to the wall. Can i use PVA to create a firmer surface to adhere the bitumen?
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freddymercurystwin

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 10:58 pm Reply with quote

If you can damp proof a cellar for 45 its cheap at 100X the price!
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wavetrain

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 12:19 pm Reply with quote

Most BCOs would be of the opinion that it is impossible to damproof a cellar with paint alone since a simple film of paint needs to hold back the hydrostatic pressure of water in the soil behind.

And anyway the datasheet on your paint specifically excludes your situation since you have a defect which is making the brickwork damp.

There are innerwall drainage systems for cellar which either vent the moisture away or pump it away at intervals, I suggest you google them.
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freddymercurystwin

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 12:37 pm Reply with quote

wavetrain wrote:
There are innerwall drainage systems for cellar which either vent the moisture away or pump it away at intervals, I suggest you google them.

He thought 45 was expensive!!!!!!!! icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif icon_lol.gif
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wavetrain

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 2:20 pm Reply with quote

This got me thinking how semi-basement flats are built, you know the type in London where you look down on the basement flat as you walk past, but the next sory up is a quite a few steps up.

I am guessing they could be made by a concrete slab for floor in the basement then the floor and walls tanked with bitumen then inner walls and further concrete slab put over the tanking.

I have allways fancied a basement, I may start digging one this weekend as long as I can find a hole to put the clay I will need to dig out.
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alittlerespect

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Joined: 19 Feb 2009
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Location: Surrey,
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 9:35 pm Reply with quote

Your best bet would be to invest in a material called 'synthaproof', apply 3 coats. To find out more about synthaproof do a www. search. First coat will be a bit hit and miss, but dont worry, second coat will get 95% of the bits you missed the first time and the third coat should give a hit of around 99.9%


You will need to work out your wall area to determine the amount of material you will need.
Regards
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