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Small extension - planning permission needed?


 
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TheRowans

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Location: Kent,
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 1:51 pm Reply with quote

Hubby and I have a bit of a budget to stick to for the kitchen/diner conversion we are planning to do in the 1930s mid terrace we have just bough. To make a bit of extra space for the kitchen, we are hoping to extend the old outside loo (now a tiny utility area housing a washing machine and boiler) by squaring it off. Would be app 6m2, in to the centre of the property.

We will of course speak to the planning department once we have moved in, but by looking at the sketch, does anyone know if that is likely to need planning permission? It is not a conservation area, others have done it in the street.

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Chukka63

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 2:01 pm Reply with quote

if your property has never been extended in the past then you shouldnt need planning permission but there exceptions.
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Blagard

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 3:17 pm Reply with quote

Have a look at the guide below. In your case an excellent chance it will not be needed.

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/england/public/buildingwork/projects/workcommonextensionreal/
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m2p (13 Mar 2010)
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TheRowans

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 5:54 pm Reply with quote

Thanks! Will obviously check it out properly once in, but sounds positive then. Would save on planning application costs and the time it would take to apply. The property has never been extended, apart from a loft conversion within permitted development guidelines (dormer loft window).

Hoping to get the complete job including budget kitchen to under 20K.
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m2p (13 Mar 2010)
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noseall

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 6:52 pm Reply with quote

You don't live in a conservation area, heritage, outstanding natural beauty, national park, or owt like that do you?

Look out for covenants. icon_wink.gif
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TheRowans

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 7:14 pm Reply with quote

noseall wrote:
You don't live in a conservation area, heritage, outstanding natural beauty, national park, or owt like that do you?


Nope, it's a bog standard area, no danger of that.
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jeds

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 5:16 pm Reply with quote

TheRowans wrote:
noseall wrote:
You don't live in a conservation area, heritage, outstanding natural beauty, national park, or owt like that do you?


Nope, it's a bog standard area, no danger of that.


In that case it will fall under permitted dvelopment and no planning application is necessary. Don't confuse that with building regulations though. Assuming you intend removing those internal walls - i.e. to make the room one one plan space - You will need to apply for building regs.
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DOHdesigns

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 6:48 pm Reply with quote

Some local authority's welcome pre-application advice free of charge anyway so even still... you could send something like that sketch to them for their comments/approval icon_smile.gif And... if it does fall within PD, you may as well apply for a Certificate of Lawfulness, which would state planning was not required. This would help if you were to be faced with problems down the line (i.e. neighbours reporting potential unauthorised works and if/when you come to sell... even though you have just bought the property) icon_smile.gif
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