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Plaster Directly On Electric Cabling

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fitzer

from United Kingdom

Joined: 05 Aug 2006
Posts: 2
Location: Northamptonshire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 6:20 pm Reply with quote

Hi,

I\\\'ve got a channel that\\\'s about 12mm deep, and a cable to a light switch which is 4mm deep.
If I put oval conduit in, I reckon I\\\'ll have to chisel into the brick work to leave enough depth for a decent layer of plaster.

Is this what needs to be done, or can you get away with plastering directly on to the cable?

Any thoughts / comments appreciated.

Cheers,
Fitz.
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breezer

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 6:27 pm Reply with quote

you cant directly plaster over a cable
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fitzer

from United Kingdom

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Location: Northamptonshire,
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 6:40 pm Reply with quote

Dang,

Thought you might say that.
Thanks for the quick response.
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Gasman1015

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 6:54 pm Reply with quote

Yes, you can plaster over the cable, better job in capping though.
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breezer

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 7:07 pm Reply with quote

you can, but you must not, as it has no mechanical protecton
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crystal ball

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 7:11 pm Reply with quote

breezer wrote:
you can, but you must not, as it has no mechanical protecton


If the cable is sheathed it does not need any further protection, no need for capping or conduit
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RMS

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2006 8:18 pm Reply with quote

pvc/pvc cable requires no mechanical protection plastered in a wall provided they run in the safe zones.

Although we all no its good practice to fit capping for impact protection.
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Jaymack

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 2:59 am Reply with quote

If the cable is run in the safe zone as mentioned already, there is no need for any protection for this cable. Capping is advised where someone else is doing the plastering later to avoid trowel damage. Chiselling into the brickwork is to be avoided for cable runs, since it weakens the building structure.

Next Please.

Jaymack
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dingbat

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 9:28 am Reply with quote

Surprised at you, Breezer. icon_wink.gif

Flat twin and earth cable already has mechanical protection - that's what the grey sheath is for. It can be buried directly in plaster, but as others have said, capping (plastic or galvanised) is better. And if you have 12mm plaster depth that is plenty deep enough for capping.
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The Jeep

from United Kingdom

Joined: 22 Jun 2006
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Location: London,
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 3:16 pm Reply with quote

According to Building Regs, you can chisel vertically up to 1/3 of the thickness of the wall. Horizontal chases are limited to 1/6th wall thickness.
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thatguy250

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Oct 2009
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Location: Kent,
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2009 7:54 pm Reply with quote

just put it in a conduit. Get galvanised, the plastic stuff always splits. It just might save having to rip it all out when someone hammers in a tack for a picture frame and gets a nice bang icon_smile.gif
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RF Lighting

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2009 7:56 pm Reply with quote

He's probably sorted it by now icon_wink.gif
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thatguy250

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2009 8:03 pm Reply with quote

ye, probably, I was just bored and found myself happily going through writing obvious comments on loads of questions completely oblivious to when they were posted lol icon_redface.gif
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