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Connecting a new free-standing electric oven


 
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ElRay

from United Kingdom

Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 4
Location: Cornwall,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 3:29 pm Reply with quote

The previous occupants of my recently-bought home left behind an electric oven on which the thermostat doesn't work. It's seen better days & i'd like to replace it with another free-standing electric oven of similar size. However, the on/off switch (control unit?) is located on the opposite wall (kitchen is 2.35m wide). The wiring appears to go into the wall immediately behind the oven &, presumably, across the ceiling & into the opposite wall to connect to the control unit (?).

My question is this, can any new oven I buy be easily connected up to the existing wiring or am I looking at having to completely re-model my kitchen just to get a new oven?
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 3:35 pm Reply with quote

when you say "oven" do you mean "oven" or do you mean "cooker?"
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ElRay

from United Kingdom

Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 4
Location: Cornwall,
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 3:58 pm Reply with quote

It's a cooker - double oven with 4-ring ceramic hob.

I also meant to say that I'm aware that fuses must be compatible. I don't intend to perform any installation myself, I'll get someone qualified to do it. I just need to know if the existing wiring/cables can be used without having to re-wire the kitchen.
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davy_owen_88

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:01 pm Reply with quote

To answer that you will need to tell us what size the cables are and what conditions they run through. You will also need to know the load of the new cooker/oven/hob.
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:03 pm Reply with quote

Look at your consumer unit (fusebox). You should find an MCB (looks like a switch) or a fuse, labelled "cooker". What letters and numbers are on it, or, if a fuse what colour dots does it have?

About how old is the CU, and does it look like a professional job? (if you can post a pic that will help).

If there are no labels, invest in some white tape and a marker pen, and turn them off one at a time to see what each does.

Look behind the old cooker. Is there a plastic connection box, about the size of a single socket, with a thick cable coming out of it?
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ElRay

from United Kingdom

Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 4
Location: Cornwall,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:16 pm Reply with quote

The fusebox was upgraded last year, on opening it I can see a label beneath one of the switches showing "Cooker - 32A".

I haven't yet selected a replacement cooker. Presumably when I do whoever installs it will, if necessary, upgrade the fuse on that circuit. Since my intention is to get another cooker with similar configuration to the existing cooker (fan oven + oven/grill + 4-ring ceramic hob) there may be no difference in electrical supply requirements.

When I pull the cooker away from it's current location, the cable goes straight into the wall, behind plater & tiles. There is no visible box.

Can the installer simply unscrew the existing cable from the back of the old cooker & re-connect it to the new cooker (after replacing fuses in the fusebox, if needed)?
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Steve

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 5:46 pm Reply with quote

You seem obsessed with replacing the fuse/MCB. You wont need to. 32 amps is plenty.

And replacing with MCB will normally mean replacing the cable. Which you probably dont want.

And you can DIY, theres nothing to stop you, as this work is non-notifiable. It is a straight swap. icon_biggrin.gif
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 7:23 pm Reply with quote

But it would be A Good Idea to fix a cooker outlet to the wall to terminate the cables in



I prefer the ones with a removable cover separate from the block inside. AFAIK Crabtree and MK are still like that, but some of the others are in one piece and more difficult, with the big thick cables. You can sometimes tell by looking to see that the external screw heads are not in quite the same place as usual.

p.s. a cooker with an electric oven and a gas hob is best to cook with
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ElRay

from United Kingdom

Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Posts: 4
Location: Cornwall,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 11:46 am Reply with quote

Thank you JohnD & Crafty for your responses. I don't want to replace any fuses & the suggestion that I can simply detach the old cooker from existing cabling & connect it to the new cooker is good news. It gives me more confidence to get out there & select a replacement cooker.

I take your point about getting someting fitted to the wall behind the cooker & will investigate that.

Unfortunately we do not have natural gas piped to our village (north coast Cornwall ~4miles south west of Newquay) & I already have oil-fired ch with huge oil tank & don't also want to have loads of Calor gas cylinders hanging around as well. Dual fuel was something we could enjoy back in Hampshire before moving here & it remains a happy memory.
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