seperate oven and hob

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by fred2892, 3 Aug 2002.

This topic originated from the How to page called Installing an electric cooker.

  1. fred2892

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    I am fitting a new kitchen and am replacing a free standing cooker with a seperate oven and hob. How do I wire them in? Do I need two seperate cables from the switch, or can I link the hob to the oven and then to the switch? Do I need a junction box to double out from the single cable? Any comments appreciated. Thanks. Fred.
     
  2. AnonymousImport

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    Hello Fred.....just connect the wires from both hob and oven and connect both to the wall socket......
     
  3. AnonymousImport

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    Hi Fred.
    It depends on the rating of the appliance! If it's below 13 amps you can use a wall socket. An electric hob will certanly be more than this, and should be hard wired to a cooker outlet that your old cooker was taken from!
    Small fan ovens/ovens with a grill in the same compartment are usually ok in a wall socket (13amp)but use heat resistant flex
     
  4. fred2892

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    Replies very much appreciated.
    Thanks a lot,
    Fred.
     
  5. AnonymousImport

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    I did the same job. The hob is the bigger load, so wire that back to the old cooker outlet on the wall. You can usually loop the oven into the terminal box on the hob, especially if the oven is directly under the hob.
     
  6. fred2892

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    Yes,
    Thats exactly how I worked it in the end. I used the original cooker cable for the hob and used some 2.5mm 13amp 3 core butyl insulated cable to feed the oven from the hob. Hope this is of use to someone else in the future.
    Thanks,
    Fred.
     
  7. AnonymousImport

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    Thanks alot guys! I had exactly the same problem as Fred, the only difrence being that I wired the oven on it's own to the cooker point as I wasn't fitting the hob till later,
    everything was fine till I touched the oven housing,blue sparks shot out and it stopped working - I checked my wiring , the earth was blown off, but it was wired propaly,was it me or was the oven faulty? it was rated 13amp(min)
     
  8. AnonymousImport

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    Sounds like a a major live to earth short circuit when you touched the oven - maybe a fault in the oven, or a loose live wire inside it dropped down and contacted the casing. If the wiring to the main terminals is OK, then you could take off some of the side panels and have a look inside. There is bound to be some scorch marks where the arcing took place, so you might be able to figure out what happened.
     
  9. AnonymousImport

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    thanks, thats basicaly what I figured - I returned the oven and I now have a new one, the only thing is I have it on a 13amp plug until I fit the hob, as I'm afraid of the same thing happening again! I first thought it might be because I overloaded it by fixing it on it's own to the 30amp circuit.

    Steve
     
  10. AnonymousImport

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    Nope - you can't overload the oven by having it on a 30A supply, it will just draw the required current to meet the rating - even if it's only 10 amps. However, the 30 A circuit will allow a higher instantaneous fault current (lots of sparks etc) when there is something wrong inside the oven - which it seems happened to your first one. At least the supplier changed it for you.
     
  11. AnonymousImport

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    My oven instructions state that the cable must be able to withstand 85 deg C due to hob fitted above.
    Does anyone know if this over the limit of regular 6mm PVC T&E ? Thanks
     
  12. obiwan

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    I've got a seperate electric double oven and gas hob. I want to change to an electric ceramic hob.
    Can I wire both oven and hob to the main 30 amp cooker outlet or will it overload it? The oven is 6kw and so will be the new ceramic hob. The existing gas hob is connected to the 13 amp circuit.
    Any help would be appreciated.
     
  13. Jay

    Jay

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    My oven is 3.6kw and my hob is 6.8 kw,
    I wish to connect them. To a 6mm cable which is wired to my main unit, with a seperate 45 amp fuse just for my hob and oven
    can I do this and if so what type of box would I use. thanks for any help Jay.
     
  14. DM

    DM

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    Here are a few important comments on the methods used in the messages above. Everyone is missing the important point about protection of the cables use.
    Bottom line is that the hob which has a high kW rating needs to be fed by at least 4mmsquared cable depending on the hob rating. Just use 6mmsquared - it's the standard used.
    The oven on the other hand can be and normally is rated much lower than the hob. Some ovens can be fed by as little as 1.5mmsquared cable.

    Now remember that all cables MUST be protected by their upline breaker or fuse. i.e. the rating of the protection device just upline of the cable must be rated lower than the current carrying capacity of the cable.

    For example the 6mm sq cable will be protected nicely by a 32amp breaker or fuse, maaaybe even a 40 amp fuse depending (I wouldn't). NOT a 45 amp fuse as mentioned by one writer.The cable could burnout before the fuse blew.
    In short connect the hob to the main cooker outlet protected by sensible sized fuse or breaker.

    Now for the oven:
    Having a much smaller cable, as low as 1.5mm sq this MUST be protected by a fuse whose size is no bigger than about 13amp.
    As such you CANNOT connect this directly to the hob or directly to the cooker outlet!!! Doing so leaves it unprotected up to the rating of the main hob protection device.
    I suggest feeding the oven from a fused spur with fuse of sensible size dependant upon the rating of the oven and the cable size.
    You can feed the fused spur from a socket circuit (recommended) or from the main cooker outlet.
    Remember that the cable from the cooker outlet to the fused spur must be rated higher than its upline protection e.g. use 6mm sq cable between cooker outlet and fused spur if the fuse on the cooker circuit is 32 amp. In any case it'll be next to impossible to get three 6mm sq cables under the terminals of the cooker outlet. (one into outlet, one out to hob, one out to feed the fused spur).
    Just feed the fused spur from a socket circuit.

    Be safe!
     
  15. mac5

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    Same as before, I need to wire in a seperate hob and oven. Both of the appliances come with a short cable. So is it ok to use these existing cables to connect to a terminal box/junction box to the main 6mm cable to the cooker fuse?
     

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