DIYnot
Local | Network
   DIYnot > Forums
Local | Network
DIYnot Network Local DIYnot Network Local  
  Forum IndexForum Index     RulesRules    HelpHelp     Join FREERegister Free     About CookiesCookies     SearchSearch     LoginLogin 

Welding...


 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > General Discussion
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
imamartian

from United Kingdom

Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 8994
Location: Derbyshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 54 times

PostPosted: Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:33 pm Reply with quote

... is it easy? if i manage to pick up a cheap welding kit from Lidl or Netto... could i be building a bridge over my house by tomorrow?
Back to top
 Alert Moderators

If you do not want to see this advert, click here to login or if you are new click here to join free.
Lincsbodger

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Mar 2010
Posts: 1302
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 1 time

PostPosted: Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:41 pm Reply with quote

Depends what sort of welding kit it is

I learned to weld using oxy-acetylene, i thought that was easy. I didnt get on with straight electric arc, could never get a good arc going for long. But a few years ago i got one of these auto feed wire arc welders, using flux cored wire. I get on a lot better with that, but still not as good as gas.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
imamartian

from United Kingdom

Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 8994
Location: Derbyshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 54 times

PostPosted: Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:59 pm Reply with quote

Lincsbodger wrote:
Depends what sort of welding kit it is

I learned to weld using oxy-acetylene, i thought that was easy. I didnt get on with straight electric arc, could never get a good arc going for long. But a few years ago i got one of these auto feed wire arc welders, using flux cored wire. I get on a lot better with that, but still not as good as gas.


But would you say it's do-able for your average DIYer?
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
lifesagasman

from United Kingdom

Joined: 20 Feb 2010
Posts: 4986
Location: Lancashire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 33 times

PostPosted: Mon Apr 26, 2010 11:32 pm Reply with quote

mig welding is quite easy for DIYers. as a beginner you'd find it easier with a gas- shielded set rather than gasless. it's more to learn and juggle with at first but you'll get better results. don't expect to do loads of heavy runs, though. neither type will cope, but for light work they're good.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
joe-90

from United Kingdom

Joined: 28 Oct 2005
Posts: 29256
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 852 times

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 5:28 am Reply with quote

If you are talking arc welders the bigger the transformer the easier it is. The industrial jobs that need a forklift to move are dead easy to use. The little tiny ones from netto are quite difficult to use. It's all about striking up and maintaining the arc.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Burnerman

from United Kingdom

Joined: 07 Feb 2008
Posts: 10810
Location: Northumberland,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 2176 times

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 7:14 am Reply with quote

Electric arc is dead easy for heavier materials - say 3mm - you just cant go wrong, using about 90 amps.
For thinner stuff, MIG is the only way to go to prevent burning through, using a fairly high wire speed and an excess of gas.
To practice striking the arc, I hold the electrode in a heavily gloved hand, rather than by the holder. Gives great control until you get used to it.
One of the best things I have bought is a welding mask/helmet that darkens immediately the arc is struck. Absolutely brilliant.
Cover your arms to prevent sunburn.....
John icon_smile.gif
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
PrenticeBoyofDerry

from United Kingdom

Joined: 30 Jun 2009
Posts: 17276
Location: Londonderry,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 1717 times

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 7:22 am Reply with quote

Welding is not that difficult, but it's like most things a bit of practice makes you better.
The things you must remember, a face mask and heat resistance gloves are a must.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
nickso

from United Kingdom

Joined: 30 Oct 2006
Posts: 6309
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 232 times

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 11:19 am Reply with quote

also don't weld upside down in a fleece as a burnt nipple and head banged off the sill trying to get the nugget out may be the result. icon_lol.gif
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
lifesagasman

from United Kingdom

Joined: 20 Feb 2010
Posts: 4986
Location: Lancashire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 33 times

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 11:35 am Reply with quote

open wellies are similar. once the lava settles around your ankle you can then choose between a neat scar the size of a sixpence or a snail trail right down your foot. i always opted for the wait and whistle routine till the smell of burning flesh subsided.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Lincsbodger

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Mar 2010
Posts: 1302
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 1 time

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 12:13 pm Reply with quote

nickso wrote:
also don't weld upside down in a fleece as a burnt nipple and head banged off the sill trying to get the nugget out may be the result. icon_lol.gif


HAH i learned to gas weld laid on my back looking up, doing up old cars, it took me years to get the hang of welding the right way up. One thing i learned was never put your cup of tea on the floor, otherwise it gets full of crap flying off the weld pool.

I used to charge for MOT welding based on time + materials + 1 a burn.......
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
CortinaV8

from United Kingdom

Joined: 30 Sep 2008
Posts: 495
Location: Cleveland,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 8 times

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 12:25 pm Reply with quote

I can totally relate to the burning fleece comment icon_lol.gif

Mig welding is easy for an amateur, however getting a nice looking weld takes practice, so long as you get good pentration it doesnt matter.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
nickso

from United Kingdom

Joined: 30 Oct 2006
Posts: 6309
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 232 times

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 12:42 pm Reply with quote

i've got quite a few burns now. one is quite impressive. icon_lol.gif

welding old cars is a pain in the a**e. invariably you are welding onto average quality metal with an average quality MIG with average ability. the thicker the metal the easier it is of course as you can whack the power up for more penetration without blowing through. thin car panels are a compromise between penetration and looks.

i agree with you cortinav8, making it look good is low down on the list.


lincsbodger. i taught myself the right way up on a bench and was then completely unprepared for the poor results upside down on a rusty turd. icon_lol.gif
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
ColJack

from United Kingdom

Joined: 16 Feb 2007
Posts: 11773
Location: West Midlands,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 408 times

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 1:33 pm Reply with quote

I've had a few plays at welding, but it's counter intuitive for me..
as an electrician we tend to try and prevent shorts circuits and arcs and flashes..
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > General Discussion All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


 
DIYnot
Find an Expert | Find a Supplier | Search DIYnot.com
Network | Advertising | Newsletter
DIY | DIY How To | @home | DIY Wiki | DIY Forum
By using this site you agree to our Terms of Service / Disclaimer.
Please read our Privacy Policy. Copyright © 2000-2014 DIYnot Limited.