DIYnot
Local | Network
   DIYnot > Forums
Local | Network
DIYnot Network Local DIYnot Network Local  
  Forum IndexForum Index     RulesRules    HelpHelp     Join FREERegister Free     About CookiesCookies     SearchSearch     LoginLogin 

rewiring a foreign plug

This topic originated from the How to page called Wiring a plug
Click here to return to the page called Wiring a plug.

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > Electrics UK
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
maisiemouse

from United Kingdom

Joined: 28 Nov 2005
Posts: 1
Location: Armagh,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 10:35 am Reply with quote

Hi, could someone help me, I recently bought a set of fairy lights from Thailand which had a funny two pin plug so i decided to cut it off and rewire it to a normal three pin but when i cut it there was no colours to tell me which was the live and neutral wires. Is there any way of finding out which is which? If i did wire it the wrong way what would be the result? Please could somebody help. thanks
Back to top
 Alert Moderators

If you do not want to see this advert, click here to login or if you are new click here to join free.
ban-all-sheds

from United Kingdom

Joined: 27 Aug 2003
Posts: 45052
Location: London,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 1587 times

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 11:03 am Reply with quote

Not wishing to induge in any incompetent-johnny-foreigner stuff, but are you sure that these lights are safe?

Are they CE marked?

Are they marked as conforming to any quality/safety standard whatsoever?

Are they suitable for a 230V supply?
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
slippyr4

from United Kingdom

Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 767
Location: Bedfordshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 4 times

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 1:19 pm Reply with quote

Thailand is 220V/50Hz. So, they'd probably technically work here, although might not be safe.

If they're incandescent lights, (not LED's), then it doesn't matter which you put in live, and which in neutral).

However, given that you can get 100 twinkly lights from woolies for less than a fiver, it seems a bit silly to take risks with unknown quality johnny-foreigner stuff.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
ban-all-sheds

from United Kingdom

Joined: 27 Aug 2003
Posts: 45052
Location: London,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 1587 times

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 1:24 pm Reply with quote

slippyr4 wrote:
Thailand is 220V/50Hz. So, they'd probably technically work here, although might not be safe.
Unless made there for the Japanese or US market...

Quote:
However, given that you can get 100 twinkly lights from woolies for less than a fiver, it seems a bit silly to take risks with unknown quality johnny-foreigner stuff.

Dodgy 230V lights wrapped around a tinder-dry resin-filled pine tree? What could go wrong?

OTOH - these could be the same lights that you buy in woolies...


Last edited by ban-all-sheds on Mon Nov 28, 2005 1:25 pm, edited 1 time in total
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Adam_151

from United Kingdom

Joined: 17 Jun 2004
Posts: 5715
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 132 times

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 1:24 pm Reply with quote

slippyr4 wrote:

If they're incandescent lights, (not LED's), then it doesn't matter which you put in live, and which in neutral).


It wouldn't matter anyway, ... its AC, the worst that could happen is if its a really crap set that dosen't rectify to DC, they you'll end up changing which half cycle they light on
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
slippyr4

from United Kingdom

Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 767
Location: Bedfordshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 4 times

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 1:31 pm Reply with quote

Adam_151 wrote:
slippyr4 wrote:

If they're incandescent lights, (not LED's), then it doesn't matter which you put in live, and which in neutral).


It wouldn't matter anyway, ... its AC, the worst that could happen is if its a really rubbish set that dosen't rectify to DC, they you'll end up changing which half cycle they light on


I was thinking that LED lights would probably have some kind of a controller, which might care.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Adam_151

from United Kingdom

Joined: 17 Jun 2004
Posts: 5715
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 132 times

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 2:02 pm Reply with quote

slippyr4 wrote:

I was thinking that LED lights would probably have some kind of a controller, which might care.


It couldn't possibly 'know' without an earth...
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Steve

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Apr 2005
Posts: 15895
Location: Yorkshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 220 times

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 2:56 pm Reply with quote

oooh now then . . . when i go to the shops and look at those white LED chains of xmas lights, they look like they are flickering very fast, is this because of the lack of a rectifier, and they are only lighting on half of the cycle? icon_idea.gif
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
slippyr4

from United Kingdom

Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 767
Location: Bedfordshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 4 times

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 3:02 pm Reply with quote

crafty1289 wrote:
oooh now then . . . when i go to the shops and look at those white LED chains of xmas lights, they look like they are flickering very fast, is this because of the lack of a rectifier, and they are only lighting on half of the cycle? icon_idea.gif


the led lights flicker no more than a fluorescent tube. they've probably got an electronic controller for tacky effects.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
plugwash

from United Kingdom

Joined: 28 Mar 2004
Posts: 8367
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 186 times

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 6:34 pm Reply with quote

slippyr4 wrote:

If they're incandescent lights, (not LED's), then it doesn't matter which you put in live, and which in neutral).

the only reason you should ever need to care about live/neutral reversal with remotely modern equipment is correct operation of single pole isolation and protective devices. since theese lights presumablly have neither inside them it really shouldn't matter which way round you connect them.

the type of lamp is of absoloutely no significance whatsoever (it would be in a DC system but mains is AC).
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Spark123

from United Kingdom

Joined: 02 Jun 2005
Posts: 14144
Location: Cumbria,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 394 times

PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2005 10:34 pm Reply with quote

In 240v series type string where both the wires run together I like to wire L to the nearest lamp to the plug as this allows the use of an MK powertracer (or similar) to find the dud lamp. icon_biggrin.gif
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
ban-all-sheds

from United Kingdom

Joined: 27 Aug 2003
Posts: 45052
Location: London,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 1587 times

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 12:38 am Reply with quote

Don't most lamps these days have internal links that close the circuit when they fail, so that the string doesn't go out?

Easy enough to spot the dud when they are off the tree - and when they are on there you don't know that one has gone, unless it's a really obvious one.
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Steve

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Apr 2005
Posts: 15895
Location: Yorkshire,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 220 times

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 7:47 pm Reply with quote

ban-all-sheds wrote:
Don't most lamps these days have internal links that close the circuit when they fail, so that the string doesn't go out?

yes they do, the only exception is the fuse bulb if the set has one.

incidentally, a few years ago, we bought a "pre-decorated" tree from b&q complete with a chain of 50 lights. After a few days of having it up, i noticed a few lights had gone out. odd, i thought, but left them be for a bit. Another few days passed, an i noticed the bulbs were very bright. i took them off the tree and more than half the bulbs had blown. I was quite shocked by this, since the bulbs that were burning, were taking twice their rated voltage, and producing more heat than they should, it could have easily caught fire on the tree. I was also worried about why the fuse bulb didn't blow . . . that's its job, isnt it, protecting against situations like this?

We took them back to b&q anyway, and they told us to pick another set of equivalent price. problem was, they dont sell this set of lights on their own, so how were we to know the set of 100 we picked was more expensive . . . icon_lol.gif
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
plugwash

from United Kingdom

Joined: 28 Mar 2004
Posts: 8367
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 186 times

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2005 9:32 pm Reply with quote

ban-all-sheds wrote:
Don't most lamps these days have internal links that close the circuit when they fail, so that the string doesn't go out?
they do however such links are NOT 100% reliable!
Back to top
 Alert Moderators
Search this topic :: View previous topic :: View next topic  
Post new topic   Reply to topic    DIYnot.com Forum Index > Electrics UK All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
Similar Topics   Replies   Views   Posted 
Adding a foreign socket to a ring main 9 4240 Mon Jul 03, 2006 12:20 pm
Foreign Sockets 3 666 Fri Sep 07, 2007 8:12 am
Rewiring a plug from Japan 9 860 Tue Apr 29, 2008 6:00 pm
Rewiring a plug 15 1760 Wed Jan 12, 2005 3:03 pm
REWIRING A FRENCH LAMP WITH ENGLISH PLUG 5 4460 Thu Jan 25, 2007 11:14 am


 
DIYnot
Find an Expert | Find a Supplier | Search DIYnot.com
Network | Advertising | Newsletter
DIY | DIY How To | @home | DIY Wiki | DIY Forum
By using this site you agree to our Terms of Service / Disclaimer.
Please read our Privacy Policy. Copyright © 2000-2014 DIYnot Limited.