Bathroom led light very dim

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I've got a bathroom led light that has suddenly gone very dim.
How can I tell if it's just the led bulb disc(?) or the controller behind it?
I've unplugged the bulb and can't see anything wrong.
It's a Hib momentum 0690 (which is apparently discounted now I see) would I be able to use another bulb in it or need a whole new one
 
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If the input voltage (from the switch to the fitting) is ok then you probably need a new driver of the same rating as yours. I doubt all the leds would fail at the same time
30-42v led driver
 

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If it is the driver the OEM part is here.
https://www.bathroomspareparts.co.uk/hib-momentum-0690-led-driver-0693-90517-p.asp
If it is the LED panel it is here
https://www.bathroomspareparts.co.uk/hib-momentum-0690-led-circular-module-0691-90512-p.asp
and the glass is here
https://www.bathroomspareparts.co.uk/hib-momentum-0690-shade-0692-90515-p.asp

If you are looking to buy a cheaper non-brand of the driver,
it is a 'Constant Current Driver, which means you have to check that it is provides a constant 500mA, AND then supplies 30 to 42V.
None jumped out at me when I had a quick look.

I take that Back, no idea if brand is okay/safe, but has the correct rating.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Eaglerise-...=Constant+Current+driver+500ma&qid=1641397566
 
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In the main it is buy whole new fitting, theory you can replace parts, but practice likely the LED has been over driven so is now damaged so need both driver and LED array, so only bit your keeping is the plastic cover.
 
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Read (this) , as this thread has some similar problems. As said by myself in that thread, interested to know if any SPD is fitted?
It might be interesting to you but the answer to that question in relation to this one incident would obviously mean essentially nothing.

LEDs (elements, local electronics and drivers) do not last for ever and, as I keep trying to explain to people, with products like L:ED lamps/bulbs, one has to expect an appreciable proportion of early (perhaps very early) failures - and that remains true whether or not there is any SPD 'protection'.

If one had data on 'time to failure' in hundreds or thousands of LEDs, together with knowledge of whether or not each of them had been SPD-protected' when in service, one then might be able to start getting an idea as to whether or not an SPD made any difference - but I'm not sure that I would "put any money" on the answer being "Yes" :).

Kind Regards, John
 
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I agree with @JohnW2 but have seem conflicting reports with some saying LED failure very rare, as I have found, and others saying very common.

As to:-
Quality of LED
Voltage of supply
Spike on supply
Non of the above

It is hard to say, my RCD at last house would have bouts of tripping for no good reason, with maybe two or three years between the bouts of tripping, after going over to LED my RCD did not trip, but after son moved in he got a bout of tripping which seemed to coincide with LED failures.

I have always blamed the RCD tripping on spikes on the supply, seems likely same spikes could take out LED's, but also spikes could be caused by RCD tripping.

One thing which is suspect is the one LED I did loose in old house was an expensive tube to replace the fluorescent in the kitchen, and it is the same area where my son has lost GU10 LED's, so does seem to point to a poor quality light switch.

However he blames cheap tool station GU10's. I have never bought GU10's from tool station, simply there is not one around where I live, I have used 4 outlets for bulbs, Lidi, B&M Bargains, HomeBargains, and link a local whole sale outlet, and always bought cheap. Except for the LED tubes which came from Screwfix (one failed), and some G9 bulbs from internet. And two colour changing GU10's one of which has failed from internet.

I have found LED bulbs a problem, but the problem has been flashing when off and shimmer when on, flashing stopped by adding load capacitor load-capacitor.jpg shimmer stopped by changing to a larger bulb G9-comp.jpg but the large bulb is not strictly legal to sell in the UK, as no wattage marked, or lumen marked, but cured the problem, however I have a draw full of bulbs, where I have either kept spares in days of tungsten, or swapped due to flashing or shimmer.

I am loathed to dump them, many still in their boxes, but suppose I must.
 
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I agree with @JohnW2 but have seem conflicting reports with some saying LED failure very rare, as I have found, and others saying very common.
There's bound to be a lot of variation in experience, particularly amongst people who do not have all that many LEDs (since it then becomes essentially 'pot luck'). Just as I wrote in relation to SPDs, one really needs data relating to at least hundreds, if not thousands, of them in order to get a reasonable estimate of what failure/survival actually is.

The person who has just a handful of LED bulbs in service could, on the basis of that 'pot luck', find that all last 'for years' or that all fail very early, without that telling us anything much about the true 'big picture'.
I have found LED bulbs a problem, but the problem has been flashing when off and shimmer when on ...
'Flashing when off' is, of course, primarily the fault of the wiring (i.e. it probably wouldn't happen if the circuit was very short), although I suppose one might argue that the bulbs should have in-built protection against that (a capacitor), but I don't know about 'shimmer' (other than when people try to dim LEDs, which seems to be a nightmare situation!).

Kind Regards, John
 
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'Flashing when off' is, of course, primarily the fault of the wiring (i.e. it probably wouldn't happen if the circuit was very short), although I suppose one might argue that the bulbs should have in-built protection against that (a capacitor), but I don't know about 'shimmer' (other than when people try to dim LEDs, which seems to be a nightmare situation!).
Sorry, room with problem had an electronic switch without a neutral. but same switch works A1 with standard single BA22d LED bulb, only with the G9 bulbs was there a problem.

Swap one bulb for tungsten and all worked A1, both flashing and shimmer, the flashing easy enough to get around with a load capacitor, it is the shimmer which is more of a problem.

The light switch has a relay that can be heard switching on/off, so I also have no idea why the shimmer when on. The good G9 bulbs have a large smoothing capacitor after the full wave rectifier which explains why they don't shimmer, but why with just one tungsten G9 other 4 LED G9 stop the shimmer is beyond my ken.

There is likely some interaction between switch and lamp, but only way to cure seems to be trial and error.
 
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Sorry, room with problem had an electronic switch without a neutral. but same switch works A1 with standard single BA22d LED bulb, only with the G9 bulbs was there a problem.
Ah! I suppose that using "an electronic switch without a neutral" to switch an LED load is "asking for trouble" (much worse the capacitive/inductive coupling in long cables) - with incandescents, one could get away with the inevitable small current through them when 'off', but with LED lamps/bulbs, it depends entirely what is inside them, and in some senses you're lucky that you didn't also have problems with the B22 ones!
There is likely some interaction between switch and lamp, but only way to cure seems to be trial and error.
I suppose it called be called an 'interaction' but the issue is surely likely to be the small current through the LED light/bulb (as a whole) due to the no-neutral electronic switch, with some LED lamps/bulbs flickering as a result but others not (quite possibly due to some internal 'bypass capacitor'). However, as you say, you're unlikely to discover 'which is which' other than by trial and error.

To avoid the uncertainties and hassle, I think I would probably do everything I possibly could to avoid using "no-neutral electronic switches" to switch LEDs! Indeed, I already do everything I can to avoid using 'electronic switches at all' - when I want electronics-controlled switching, I always try to use the electronics to drive a relay.

Kind Regards, John
 
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I can hear relay click so must be electronics driving a relay.
Fair enough - but, with a 'no-neutral' electronic switch, that makes things even worse, doesn't it, since the current going through the load when 'off' must be enough to power a relay coil?

My comments about favouring relay control related to the situation in which the electronics driving the relay did have n explicit neutral.

Kind regards, John
 
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