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Bathroom sink slow to drain after pouring grout water down?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by humanracer, 4 Sep 2018.

  1. humanracer

    humanracer

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    Our bathroom sink is slow to drain. It takes about 5 minutes for half a sinkful of water to drain.
    I did stupidly pour down a bucket of tile adhesive water which we were using for our new kitchen (from the bucket I used to clean the tools while tiling) so I have hope it hasn't solidified.
    Underneath the sink there is the trap which connects, via a flexible plastic pipe, to a plastic elbow shaped section which leads into a pipe connected to the floor and then to the outside drain.
    We have inspected and cleaned each of the sections and tested each part individually. At first we thought it cannot be the pipe on the floor as the sink fills up quickly but it can't be anything else. When we disconnected the pipe from the floor pipe and fed the water into a bucket instead, it goes down no problem.
    We started to test the pipe on the floor. When we slowly pour water down it works fine, however when we pour it quickly via a kettle it starts to slow down. We have put a bit stringy plastic down there as far as it will go and can't feel any obstructions.
    We have tried plunging and although it brought up some rubbish (bits of food that must have fell down when washing the dishes there) it didn't sort the draining issue.
     
  2. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    Problem sounds like its in the section under the floor. Does this go to an open gulley or directly to the drain?
     
  3. humanracer

    humanracer

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    The honest answer is I don't know. I hope it can be fixed without having to remove the kitchen tiles!
     
  4. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    Need to trace where it goes to. Possible the pipe was already partially gunged up and now you've added to it! Is the bathroom on the ground or 1st floor?
     
  5. humanracer

    humanracer

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    Ground floor. The bath works fine.
     
  6. humanracer

    humanracer

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    Is it safe to use an actual drain rod down the plastic pipe? I don't have a snake or anything else long enough.
     
  7. Nige F

    Nige F

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    Not a good idea - a drain rod might break a bend in the waste pipe when it hits it - obviously fine for 110mm drains. Like Hugh said - look outside for manholes etc. You need to find the route of the pipe.
     
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  8. HERTS P&D

    HERTS P&D

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    At no point didn't you think that pouring grout/water down your plug hole would cause a problem???

    You now need a plumber/drainage engineer before you cause any more damage.

    Andy
     
  9. cdbe

    cdbe

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    Been there, done that! Down the kitchen sink but in my case it went (from a floor level tee) up a horizontal pipe under the kitchen units that was for the washing machine waste. It managed to partially block about 1.8m of this. It forms a dense solid in the bottom half of the pipe - you'll need to mechanically remove it - it will break up quite easily - I used a length of fence strainer wire (like a wire coat hanger) with a small bent bit (just shorter than the diameter of the pipe) on the end to scrape it loose and copious amounts of water to flush it out. I was able to dismantle enough to get direct access to the straight run in question - anything else and you run the risk of ending up with a length of wire stuck in the pipe as well!!
     
  10. ReganAndCarter

    ReganAndCarter

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