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Design software (TurboCad)

Discussion in 'Software' started by loftus75, 18 Apr 2004.

  1. loftus75

    loftus75

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    It's been some time since I made a contribution to the forum so thought I might talk about my latest venture into design software.

    For the true DIY anoraks the process of project follows a pretty continuous line.

    The thought....this is that stage when you have a moment of inspiration and that deep seated feeling you must manufacturer, replenish, refurbish or build.

    The design....for years I used the fag packet approach, after all it worked for my forefathers, and though the outcomes of their efforts had that hand crafted DIY look, something which was never fully appreciated by their wives or partners, the thing they built worked. What more could you ask for?

    Today our wives or partners are not satisfied with mere function. No, our creations must meet their strict criteria of design, that is, our creation must not just do the job but must be a unique work of art.

    Fine. But I'm not an artist, while I take pride in my efforts, like my forefathers, years of experience and on the job training has left me ill equipped for the concept of design.

    However, for the likes of me, there are software packages available that make being a Frank Lloyd Wright (hope I've got his name correct), easier.

    I say 'easier', not easy. Most CAD programs use a language that would challenge a structural engineer or architect. When you first install and open TurboCad this is true. The tutorials are written in Swahili, at least that was my first impression. Still if you are persistent you will eventually overcome the language barrier. Little by little terms like, Vertex or X, Y, Z positions will become clear. Soon you will understand why that irritating error chime keeps sounding when you try and draw a straight line.

    Then one day you will be in a position to draw out your entire project, you will be able to make your build mistakes on paper instead of when using your saw. You will be able to astonish your local timber merchant with your cut lists and drawings. Of course the timber merchant will want nothing to do with you at this point, after all, he/she won't be able to blame you when he carves up your expensive piece of veneered MDF incorrectly, without a drawing any cut he makes is your fault, with a drawing he has no excuse, besides where's the adventure in having a drawing? :rolleyes:

    So back to TurboCad. My impression is you will need persistence, lots of it. Particularly if you've not used a CAD package before. I've been using Floorplan for years now and find it extremely useful for the large projects. This has been only slightly helpful while learning TurboCad, even though the Software company, IMSI manufacture/supply both FloorPlan and TurboCad.

    If I were to have one piece of advice about the program it would be, come to understand where you are in the virtual world. It's easier if I explain this by example;

    Imagine you are in a room 10x10x10, in the middle of this room there is a cube 1x1x1. You are standing in the north east corner, if you were to draw this out on paper which corner would you be? This is the crux of the program, you need to be able to draw in 2D while understanding where your drawing will appear in 3D.

    If this description has put you off learning CAD, then I have saved you about £80. On the other hand, if you recognise the value of a well planned project and are determined, TurboCad is an affordable and very useful program once understood. With it you can design everything from a walking stick to a house, you can view your designs in 2D and 3D. Once learned you can turn out a full set of plans in hours, saving you days of guess work and mis-cuts. Beyond this, your wife or partner will elevate you to the position of DIY god, your words will by the last word on the subject of DIY, you will be the Man!.....

    If you interested to learn more you can visit here
    ......if you are using another type of CAD program I'd be interested to hear about it
     
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  3. Big_Spark

    Big_Spark

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    AutoCad from Autodesk, full structural, electrical and mechanical plug-ins.

    But then it did cost the company about £6K all in with tutorials etc.
     
  4. loftus75

    loftus75

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    I've heard a lot about AutoCad, but as you say the cost is astronomical, and I suspect it's a bit on the 'over kill' for the average DIY designer. At £6K does it also make the coffee? :)
     
  5. Big_Spark

    Big_Spark

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    Your not wrong about the cost, rip off if you ask me, but we have to use what is "industry standard". Regarding the coffee..nah..I get my secretary to do that :D
     
  6. David P

    David P

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    Yep I too am a convert - but I use a mac and the answer there is a program called form•z - it really helps with quantities even giving the mass of a solid to be cast so you can work out how many bags of sand/cement/aggregate you need - the best thing though is that it models in real scale - so in theory you could design a sports stadium and zoom in to every washer and still be able to take accurate measurements from the drawings.

    I recently made a stainless steel structure that was chaos based - like a huge knot - it was hard to model but once i had done it all i had to do was isolate curves and rotation angles and instruct a metalworker to curve some tube.

    ill try and include a pic
    the design
    [​IMG]
    the object
    [​IMG]

    ok so the tube got thinner in the real thing (a cost consideration) but is not a bad transfer from computer to real world is it?
     
  7. breezer

    breezer

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    i wouldnt want of those in my garden, but it does look nice (i actually prefer the computer drawing)
     
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  9. skellem

    skellem

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    Just seen this post...I did a similar thing with a company who were at an exhibition....here's the before and after....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. breezer

    breezer

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    but you can those chairs at any good office furniture store :LOL:
     
  11. pipme

    pipme

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    Hi,

    Have used a great little package from http://www.centriforce.de/en/index.php4 Called Vector cadd.

    Vers 8 .... was small, quick, accurate .... writes the old 2D/3D NC-CNC-Programs too !! Gone well beyond that now I believe ... Nurbs and things !!

    Developed for the companies own use, I believe, in aerospace engine vane manufacture ..... You could tell it was written by engineers for engineers .... Still have copy and play around with it .. even tho' retired !!

    P
     
  12. AdamW

    AdamW

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    Some of my design guys use "Pro-Engineer". They have a whole range of plug-ins that do various things and also lots of other programs can interface with it (Skellem, try DI-Guy for those people, you can have real fun with them! Second picture didn't work, btw)
     
  13. pipme

    pipme

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    Yo ..... CADDS-5, Pro-Eng .... all conceivable plug ins, add ons, extras etc £Zillions ... Well you would all like to fly off on hols feeling just a little safer, wouldn't you ?
    Regulations ?? ..... not measured by the Release /chapter/page, but by the tonne !!
    Mind you! Take a peek here :- http://www.airsafe.com/ pick the wheat from the chaff so to speak.

    Vector cadd has a very small footprint on M$ Wins, runs in an instant, sits happily alongside other active progs etc, a very useful tool indeed.

    P
     
  14. kendor

    kendor

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    It depends on what version of turbocad you started off with, myself it was turbocad v4 and i found it very easy and straightforward to pick up following the tutorials and i was able to produce some complex technical drawings for work from the package of which i was well pleased with the results, I jumped from that version to V7 and found it a bit overwhelming at first but i believe it was imsi's attempt to draw people away from autocad and from some of the reviews i read this was indeed the case when value for money x power was one of the major talking points, I'm hoping this race against the industry standard software will not spoil turbocads ease of use too much.
    as i stated above if you find that the version of turbocad you are trialing looks too complicated either try to get v4 first or as loftus said persevere.
     
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