Ok to edge an MDF cabinet bifold door?

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I was warned off creating a composite MDF/pine cabinet door on another thread ... but just wondering if any readers had created this kind of door with success?

Basically a sheet of very solid MDF, edged with 6mm thick oak. The whole thing will be painted, and live in a pretty moisture free environment, so personally I just can't see it's going to be a problem in terms of adverse movement, but thought I'd just put it out there ...

[the reason I want to edge it is to make sure the edges don't bruise/delaminate ... just think it makes the whole thing a lot 'crisper']

 
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Yup ... I know ... 25mm MDF is bloody heavy ... but what's the choice? No one seems to sell blockboard anymore. Perhaps I should just make up a hollow version ... e.g. pine frame, with plywood skin ...

There are two of these doors, working as a bi fold, to span a 1650mm x 370mm opening ... but I need it to be minimum 25mm thick ... 30mm would be even better.
 
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I was warned off creating a composite MDF/pine cabinet door on another thread ...
That was a completely type of door where you were intending to glue an MDF panel inside a solid wood frame. Veneers and lippings (up to about 8 or 10mm thick - the thinner the better) behave very differently from solid wood frames

Basically a sheet of very solid MDF, edged with 6mm thick oak.
Many kitchen and cabinet doors are made by solid wood lipping then veneering the faces of MDF or chipboard. It will therefore work.

[the reason I want to edge it is to make sure the edges don't bruise/delaminate ... just think it makes the whole thing a lot 'crisper']
Have you considered MR-MDF? It is denser than standard MDF and cuts/profiles with a much crisper edge

I have to agree with the comments about weight. Your door blanks will weigh-in around 18kg or so which may well be too heavy for the screws, especially as the door casing side will be carrying twice that - MDF does not have good screw-holding power so you may need to drill the edges and glue-in hardwood dowels to take the screws

No one seems to sell blockboard anymore.
Yes they do. I have three fairly local timber merchants who carry it, although they refer to it as blockwood or laminboard. Made in the UK by Premier and possibly one other mill. +Have you tried timber merchants, as opposed to the sheds?

I agree with you about thickness - standard interior door is about 35mm - and I think that 25mm would look a bit "wimpy"
 
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Thanks J+K ...

... yes, MR MDF would be better edgewise, but even heavier ...

What is the lightest DIY method of creating a 30mm x 825mm x 370mm door does anyone know of? No need to suggest balsa wood etc. ....
 
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What is the lightest DIY method of creating a 30mm x 825mm x 370mm door does anyone know of? No need to suggest balsa wood etc. ....
Frame of 2 x 1in planed softwood (finishes at 44 x 22) with additional supports inside the perimeter. Glue to skins of 4mm MDF. If exact thickness is required have the timber yard plane it down to size. If you want something even stronger but lighter then find a hardwood supplier and have then reduce poplar to finished size of 30 x 22mm (poplar is lighter than softwood, but stronger - poplar plywood is used by caravan trade for this reason). This type of construction is referred to as a torsion box

 
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Great stuff ... thanks J&K ... a poplar torsion box it shall be ...

(p.s. as per title, these doors are for a cabinet ... not regular doors ... so 25-30mm is going to look very solid)
 

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