1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

rigid kitchens vs flatpack -marketing hype or genuine point?

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by cjard, 17 Feb 2015.

  1. cjard

    cjard

    Joined:
    6 Sep 2008
    Messages:
    2,334
    Thanks Received:
    250
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    So the guys who supply rigid crow about it and the flat packers don't really say anything.. Gets me wondering:

    These rigid cabinets must have been a flatpack once, some nugget in the factory assembles it and then some overworked delivery driver in a rush slams it in the back of his van and hurtles across country lanes with it - is it really better in the end?

    I've a feeling that the rigid stuff will end up potentially far more wobbly by the time it gets to site, depending on how it's been treated, if it truly is flatpack-assembled-by-someone-else..

    ..so is there something I'm missing? Are rigid kitchens glued n screwed together differently? or is this a marketing con?
     
  2. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    14,187
    Thanks Received:
    1,531
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Depends where you buy, had quality pre-assembled Shreiber units which were doweled and glued, just removing after 20 years of good service.Bought some recently from Benchmarxs and they were basic flat pack that had be pre-assembled [presumably by a 16 years old on work experience judging by the poor quality.]
    With flat pack you can always improve on the assembly adding glue or extra support to give a better quality result.
     
  3. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    3,405
    Thanks Received:
    662
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Is it really better? Yes. Or rather it should be when done properly. The difference is that flat pack comes with a limited number of KD fasteners and a few dowels and is assembled by using a screwdriver - a good quality rigid is assembled using dowels on something like 64mm or 96mm centres and is glued together AND SHOULD BE SQUARED UP (they aren't always - Howdens are you listening?). Note no, or very few, screws. It is therefore stronger and more rigid than any flat pack could ever be without interventions. Some of the cheaper rigids are put together using glue and carcass screws - not as strong as dowelled and glued, but almost, and in any case still stronger and more ridgid than flat packs. This is the technique often favoured for shop and bar fittings which are one off and have to be manufactured at speed.

    As to transporting stuff around, if a trip in a lorry destroyed furniture so readily there would be no factory assembled furniture in the shops at all, would there? The main reason for flat pack is actually to reduce shipping costs by maximising value carried per lorry load

    That's not been my experience. See comments above

    When I've done my own kitchens from flat pack in the past I've generally glued the dowels, cramped the carcasses square and left the glue to go off whilst I work on the next carcass (I use 30 minute glue). I've also added extra screws, brackets, battens, braces, etc as and where I've seen fit. That way I get a stronger and more ridgid kitchen carcass at flat-pack prices plus a bit of sweat equity
     
  4. cjard

    cjard

    Joined:
    6 Sep 2008
    Messages:
    2,334
    Thanks Received:
    250
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    What do you normally charge for fitting a 20 unit+sweat equity kitchen? :)
     
  5. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    3,405
    Thanks Received:
    662
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I wouldn't even begin to quote on a job based on number of units because there are all sorts of other factors to take into consideration, e.g. layout, access, pipework, electrics, tiling/upstands/backsplashes, worktops and joints, type of sink, how good/bad/indifferent the walls are, etc, etc. saying so much a unit is pretty meaningless to me. All I can say is that if I have to glue, screw and strengthen units it tends to put 15 to 20 minutes per unit onto my time - you can spend more time than that re-plumbing and moving wairin/gas pipes in a bad one.
     
  6. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    14,187
    Thanks Received:
    1,531
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    A kitchen is more than just units, kitchen company's often have a set fee for each unit , say it's £20, that's for every cup'd unit, every socket installed or moved, every tap, sink, etc. etc. Soon adds up.
     
  7. Nige F

    Nige F

    Joined:
    28 Jun 2005
    Messages:
    19,912
    Thanks Received:
    1,459
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Soon adds up - indeed ! . £11k for a nice one from wickes . So I bought some new cupboards and changed a few bits . £1100 from wickes. DIY rules
     
  8. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page