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Are these walls load bearing?

Discussion in 'General DIY' started by nyitraikaroly, 20 May 2015.

  1. nyitraikaroly

    nyitraikaroly

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    Hi All,

    I just moved in with my girlfriend to our new home (built in 1970's) in the UK and are fitting a new kitchen.
    My question is, can we remove both these walls, or at least on of them? It would make the kitchen much bigger and more comfortable.

    The 2 walls are sitting in the middle of the ~6m wide property about a meter apart. They are 8-9cm wide, with the thin but tall grey bricks (sorry, I don't know the appropriate name).
    The beams are sitting on both of them, but the joints are only on the left handside one. There are no walls sitting right above them, only the cross beams.
    The cross beams are ~40cm apart and are joint from the 2 sides on the middle-left wall. I didn't have the time to ask an architecture to take a look at it yet, but a friend of mine who worked in construction assumes that only this wall is load bearing.

    Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    PrenticeBoyofDerry

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    The wall supporting the timber joist where they overlap, will be a supporting wall as far as the above floor/structure is concerned. The second wall, unless tying in the perpendicular walls, will unlikely be a supporting wall.
    But I would always recommend getting the advice of a structural engineer, how can do informed calculations for you. It may cost a wee bit of money, but better knowing for definite, then assuming!
     
  3. Jackrae

    Jackrae

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    Although the right-hand corridor wall MAY not be load bearing, if the cross beams are tied to this wall, it does provide stability to the left-hand wall. In effect the two walls form a box structure with the cross beams acting as the top of the "box"
     
  4. nyitraikaroly

    nyitraikaroly

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    Thanks for the thoughts, I think you guys might be right...

    I sketched up the plan floor maybe that's gonna be some help. It's a mid-terraced house btw.

    I'd want to knock down the 85cm long wall which is 220cm away from the outer wall (well joint wall with the neighboor actually).

    There's already a 34cm long, 19cm wide hole cut on it for the old ventillating system, and it's made of bricks 45cmx21cmx6cm.

     
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