1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Blades for cutting kitchen worktop

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by Hager, 9 Jul 2019.

  1. Hager

    Hager

    Joined:
    29 Aug 2009
    Messages:
    191
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Evening,

    I've got some worktop and up stands to cut over the weekend what tooth blades are recommend? Is it as simple as the more teeth the finer the cut?

    Going to be using a circular saw for the worktop and a mitre saw for the upstand.
     
  2. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    13,765
    Thanks Received:
    1,464
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Finer the better , router gives best finish .Don't use a jigsaw, will butcher a worktop.
     
    Last edited: 10 Jul 2019
  3. Bosswhite

    Bosswhite

    Joined:
    15 Jun 2012
    Messages:
    2,551
    Thanks Received:
    338
    Location:
    Southampton
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    If you have a jigsaw you can get "upside down" cutting blades for cutting work surfaces , probably the easiest way of cutting work surfaces by a DIYer, the circular saw sounds a bit harsh
     
  4. ironsidebod

    ironsidebod

    Joined:
    17 Feb 2009
    Messages:
    330
    Thanks Received:
    41
    Location:
    Nottingham
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I've used the Bosch variant of those blades to good effect. Just masking tape on the top of the worktop to prevent splintering and scratches and an anti splinter piece in the Makita.
     
  5. bobasd

    bobasd

    Joined:
    2 Dec 2017
    Messages:
    1,116
    Thanks Received:
    155
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    i've used 80tooth blades in a DeWalt 7 1/4" circular saw to cut and rip 40mm laminate work tops, and 15mm melamine furniture panels.
    sometimes the cut needs a rub with a small block plane and a light sanding.

    if your cutting work top mitres then run a first 8mm-10mm cut as usual with the router then remove the the waste side with the circular saw and/or jig saw - its quick and saves on mitre bits.

    if you give it a go then first practice on some redundant stuff.
     
    Last edited: 10 Jul 2019
  6. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    3,192
    Thanks Received:
    613
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Jigsaws are a very inaccurate way to make any long cut - the circular saw approach (especially when cut from the underside) is far and away better. With jigsaws the "upside down" blades, actually called downcut blades (T101BR and T101BRF), are a very poor approach in my own experience as they are prone to flexing in the cut and therefore often won't give you a plumb cut on a 30 to 38mm worktop. If you must use a jigsaw it's generally better to flip the top over and cut from the underside using a fine tooth laminate blade designed for the task such as a T101BIF (those are Bosch blade numbers, other firms often quote them as equivalences).
     
  7. blup

    blup

    Joined:
    5 Nov 2007
    Messages:
    892
    Thanks Received:
    124
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  8. Hager

    Hager

    Joined:
    29 Aug 2009
    Messages:
    191
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for the replys, i was think using a router but not sure my 1/4" will be powerful enough. I won't be using a jigsaw as they are no good for accurate straight cuts.
    Think i will go with bobasd approach then i don't have to buy any blades.
     
  9. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    13,765
    Thanks Received:
    1,464
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Worktop cuts require 1/2” router so bits not made for 1/4”.
     
  10. Hager

    Hager

    Joined:
    29 Aug 2009
    Messages:
    191
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Damn, what about carefully using a fine blade on a multitool? Its only 28mm thick.
     
  11. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    3,192
    Thanks Received:
    613
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Not a chance - multitools simply can't cut straight enough. Best method is circular saw with fine tooth blade and straight edge, then 1/2in router with straight edge, then very sharp fine tooth hand saw (providing you can hand saw a straight line)
     
  12. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    13,765
    Thanks Received:
    1,464
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    More chance off cutting a straight line with a blunt spoon .
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Hager

    Hager

    Joined:
    29 Aug 2009
    Messages:
    191
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Final update- thank you for all the advice i decided to use my router in the end and it cut perfectly for the first pass but i went a bit to deep on the 2nd and it damaged the front edge a little bit but you won't see it so not to much of a issue.
     
Loading...

Share This Page