Damaged Paintwork

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by Rebecca Filer, 28 Apr 2021.

  1. Rebecca Filer

    Rebecca Filer

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    Hi, I was a bit heavy handed with the hoover and bashed it against the skirting board in that particular room. It has taken some paint off, you can see the wood underneath but there aren’t any chunks of wood missing. Would you sand with fine sandpaper? Then wipe clean and apply paint suitable for skirting boards? I have attached a photo. Thanks.
     

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  3. JohnD

    JohnD

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    No you haven't.

    You can "copy and paste" into your reply

    Or "upload a file"

    Edit

    OK, you have now.
     
  4. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    You'll get lots of that as the house is "lived in"

    Rub it down Inthe affected area and paint some white gloss on it preferably the same paint as what was already on it.

    Avoid oil based unless the woodwork is already painted in oil based
     
  5. opps

    opps

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    Why avoid oil based paints?

    As a professional decorator, I try to avoid waterbased finishes on woodwork. I don't like the way they flow and have found that areas that are often touched, the oils in our skin make the wb paints soft over time. WB does have the advantage of being less smelly, drying faster and not yellowing in dark rooms.

    Anywho, regardless of which paint the OP decides to use, yes as you say they can feather out the dinks (to a degree) but they will need to apply a basecoat, eg waterbased primer/undercoat or even something like Zinsser BIN before applying gloss. without anykind of primer, the gloss will just soak in to the wood (much more than something like eggshell would).
     
  6. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    If the op was to use a self priming paint like zinnser perma white they would be ok for a small touch up.

    Oil based is ok if you go for Matt or eggshell but as a gloss it's a waste of time it just yellows far to quick. A mate of mine done his whole house in oil, 8 months later it's yellow except for areas around the windows..

    Oil based might be good for business as no sooner do you finish you got to paint it again.

    It's also an arse to clean the brushes, nor environmentally appropriate
     
  7. Chivas69

    Chivas69

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    I'd start with sanding the whole area as it's covered in bits and nibs.
    It looks like water based satin is the finish there. What I would do is sand it over then apply an acrylic primer/undercoat. This is very quick drying and forms a much better bnd for the top coat of satin.
    If you want to really protect from future knocks then do what Opps says above and use some zinsser bin before applying the top coats.
     
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  8. opps

    opps

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    You may well be correct about oil based gloss. I have not had a customer ask me to use interior OB gloss since 2010.

    Frankly, I find the suggestion that I recommend oil based paints because I don't care about the longevity of my work to be highly offensive. I do not know what you do for a living, but after 30 years as a professional decorator I find that oil based paints lay off more evenly and are far more durable than waterbased paints.

    I spend thousands on Festool dust extractors and sanders. My work environment is clean enough to enable me to put my oil based brushes in a Brushmate and use them on the next job without the need to clean them for (literally) years.

    It is undeniable that waterbased paints are better with regards to the volatile organic compounds released whilst they cure. They do however require much more electricity to manufacture and contrary to popular belief many do release toxins. I am often presented with woodwork that has been "toshed" with waterbased paints when houses are put on the market. They are a nightmare to sand flat because the waterbased paint clogs my abrasives. The labour (read:energy and cost) to sand them is far greater than sanding oil based paints flat.

    I personally use oil based paints because I want to provide a high quality of finish and want the job to last as long as possible. Given my exposure to the solvents released, yes, I would rather use waterbased paints but at the moment I am not willing to compromise the quality of my work.
     
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  9. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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