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Damp and Mould behind kitchen base units and psocid infestation

Discussion in 'Building' started by brian284842, 25 Aug 2020.

  1. brian284842

    brian284842

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    I had a kitchen fitted a few months ago. It was fitted too soon after replastering and moisture built up underneath and behind the base units, so the backing boards became mouldy.

    Soon after, mildew eating insects called psocids (as best I can tell from my googling) have shown up to enjoy the mould.

    It is a howdens kitchen, so the backing boards are thicker than the light panels you get in some units (seemed like a bonus at the time but now I wish I just had some light panels to knock out and replace!)
    I think that the backing boards are integral to the structure of the units so I can't easily cut out and replace them.

    There is also some bare concrete flooring under some of the units, which soaked up a load of water during the plastering.

    I have a few ideas about how to tackle this but would really appreciate some advice.

    I leave a dehumidifier running every night.

    I am going to paint sealant over the areas of bare concrete flooring.

    I am going to use a weed sprayer to spray something like Astonish Mould and Mildew up the back of the units. Unfortunately, I won't be able to see how much coverage I get. This is also an issue at the side where there is piping for the sink and gas, as the active agent in that spray can let off dangerous gases when it contacts some metals. Perhaps some sort of bleach mix would be better.

    I am considering drilling some holes into the back of the units and filling the space behind them as thoroughly as I can with expanding foam. This may be a terrible idea and I'm hoping people here who actually know what they are doing might weigh in with an opinion.

    Thank you
    Brian
     
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  3. conny

    conny

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    Who authorised the installation of the units before the plaster was fully dry?
    The fungus has appeared, not because of the damp trapped behind the units, but because their is no airflow behind them. Airflow would have helped to dry out the plaster and prevent the mildew forming. You could probably use the Mould & Mildew spray if you can be sure of covering the majority of the back boards and if you spray enough it may run down over the wholes surface. Regarding the pipework, is there any way you can cover the pipes, maybe with pipe insulation of even just wrap some rags around them until after spraying and then remove them?
     
  4. JohnD

    JohnD

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    put a fan or two - ordinary domestic fans will do - to blow air under and behind the units and dry it out.

    Provided you have no leak or other source of water, the flow of fresh air will evaporate the water off the surface.

    as the moisture content drops the fungus and insects will die.
     
  5. ****don’t put fans anywhere near it. you’ll be blowing mildew and fungus spores all around the room which you will be inhaling****
    wet plaster wouldnt cause this problem. it would just dry , albeit slower than normal. sounds more like a historic /ongoing damp issue.
    it’s perfectly feasible to remove single or multiple kitchen units .get a competent handyman or similar to remove them and go from there.
     
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  6. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Surely even benny has experience of drying out a house that is wet after an overflowing bath or burst pipe?

    Seemingly not.

    There are mould spores everywhere, in the entire world.

    They will grow if you give them damp and warmth.

    Not otherwise.

    The fan will reduce both.

    And open the windows so that the water vapour you have extracted by evaporation can escape the room.
     
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  8. stop being a fool again , it’s not the same thing. he specifically said it’s an ongoing problem with mold/ mildew growing on his units, with potentially dangerous spores. stop being a fool and giving people foolish advice. the units need to come out.
     
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  9. in the event of an insurance claim either in your scenario or in john fool d’s imaginary scenario the insurer/contractor will ensure your health and wellbeing above all else. yes huge fans and dehumidifiers would be used , while the property is unoccupied, not while your sat there inhaling it all.
     
  10. Nige F

    Nige F

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    benny . you sound like Mr. T. "crazy fool ":ROFLMAO:
     
  11. you won’t get me in no aeroplane fool.:LOL:
     
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