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Fan / Humidistat required for slightly damp cellar. Any recommendations?

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by moonhog, 31 Dec 2015.

  1. moonhog

    moonhog

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    Hello

    My Victorian terrace has a slightly damp cellar, and a specialist suggested that installing an extractor fan with a humidistat might help - presumably so that it turns itself on whenever it detects a certain level of moisture in the air, and also to encourage the air to 'move'?

    The basement is 4m x 5m, and has a small window in the front. There is a working radiator in there too. I know that adding a fan won't miraculously convert the cellar, but it's going to be used for storage and I want to make it as dry as possible.

    Does anyone have any experience of installing a fan into a cellar, and any recommendations on a suitable make/model?

    Thanks in advance.
     
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  3. AndyPRK

    AndyPRK

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    I think you are wasting your time!

    They don't get humid, they get damp.

    I would cut a circle in the glass and fit one of the them fan things. (no elec required)
     
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  4. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    In my experience "specialists" often suggest a humidity fan to fix problems with damp, moisture, mould etc. It doesn't solve anything.

    I agree with Andy. If you want it dry you need to fix the damp. Cellar probably needs tanking properly.

    PS Hope you don't live in a flood risk area!;)
     
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  5. moonhog

    moonhog

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    Cheers Gents.

    Can't afford/justify tanking - it's only 6ft 2 high anyway, so would need digging-out/underpinning etc.

    I just want to store bikes, tools, boxes etc down there - and so want to make it as dry as possible.

    I guess the thought behind it is just to get some air moving around and through it, there is condensation in places also.

    And yes I am in a flood risk area - but at the top of a hill, thankfully!
     
  6. AndyPRK

    AndyPRK

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    I think the floor will always be damp. Put polythene down before putting stuff on the floor.
     
  7. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Heard of global warming?

    Albeit a small part and to a small extent, but you are literally warming the globe with that.

    Basically you have a choice between two options.

    1) A considerable investment to waterproof, insulate and ventilate the space.

    2) Not putting anything in there which will be harmed by damp.
     
  8. moonhog

    moonhog

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    I know that tanking/waterproofing is the best solution, but I can't justify the cost - I just want to 'manage' the damp as best I can, and be able to use it for storage / workshop etc. I was hoping that installing a fan to get some air moving might help, maybe that was too optimistic.

    Thanks for the replies.
     
  9. AndyPRK

    AndyPRK

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    A fan is a good idea.

    A humistat isn't. Maybe a heating timer to control it. Or a mechanical fan as i said
     
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  11. moonhog

    moonhog

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    Thanks Andy. I'm definitely going to put a fan/vent in.
     
  12. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    It will always be damp down there.
     
  13. Taylortwocities

    Taylortwocities

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    I seem to have a similar, more personal, problem:D
     
  14. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Do not try to solve it by installing a fan.
     
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  15. moonhog

    moonhog

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    OK. I've attached a couple of photos of at it's worst below:
    Left hand side basement.JPG
    My cellar is split into 2 "chambers"; the one in the picture is the left hand side, with no window, and is where it seems to be worst. There is no movement of air whatsoever, and hence why I thought of a fan.
    The front external wall is slightly damp, but the ceiling above (2nd photo) is covered in water droplets.
    under front door and air brick.JPG
    Above that front wall is my front door, and there is an airbrick just below it - presumably why the ceiling is sloping at the front, to allow air into the floor void??
    Is this cold air above the ceiling, and the warm air in the basement (from radiator) causing the moisture on the ceiling? Or something more sinister?
    I've marked the wallplates, the joists run left to right in the picture. They're OK/dry on the other side of the cellar, I've lifted the boards.
    As I've said before, I know tanking is the best solution. But there must be something less expensive that I can do to decrease the moisture / increase the airflow?
     
    Last edited: 3 Jan 2016
  16. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Can you put a window in this chamber?
     
  17. moonhog

    moonhog

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    No window - there's steps up to the front door behind the external wall.
    The other chamber has a small window, but I don't leave it open for security reasons.
     
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