Help with sealed units in wooden casement windows

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I would appreciate any help or advice on how to replace the sealed unit in the non-opening side of a double-glazed wooden casement window. I have salvaged windows from a house that was having new plastic fitted and will use these as my replacements

Now the easy option I guess, would be to remove and replace the non-opening side with an opening window? However I am unsure how the blank side is fixed in to the frame? It looks as if the sealed unit was fitted after the casement was attached to the frame? Obviously I am looking cause a minimal amount of damage in an attempt to avoid problems.

As I have mentioned I have also thought about removing the sealed units and swapping them around any thoughts this would helpful as would be an idea of the best way to go about it and what sort of putty or sealant to use?
 
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......'However I am unsure how the blank side is fixed in to the frame?'......

Do you mean this is a dummy sash ie it looks like an opener but is fixed?

If so then yes before the unit is fitted the dummy would be set on blocks to centralise it then nailed or screwed through into the frame. In theory its just a case of fitting hinges to it and handles and it should work.

Can you take some pics?
 
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......'However I am unsure how the blank side is fixed in to the frame?'......

Do you mean this is a dummy sash ie it looks like an opener but is fixed?

If so then yes before the unit is fitted the dummy would be set on blocks to centralise it then nailed or screwed through into the frame. In theory its just a case of fitting hinges to it and handles and it should work.

Can you take some pics?

Thank you yours is a Perfect description and I will take some pictures asap
 
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Yep as i thought, its a John Carr/Boulton & Paul window, the dummy sash will either be stapled in with 50mm staples or nailed in, again 50mm nails, think these windows never saw any glue :D

Just a case of getting some stormproof hinges and some stays and keeps, hinges are generic but as JC/B&P are no longer around you will struggle to get matching stays and keeps, others are a plenty in B&Q and wickes but you'll need to replace all on one window depending on how close the match.

As for the sealed units, in the days these were put in on ordinary linseed putty, it later turned out the linseed oil attacked the double glazed units seal and eventually they misted up, because of this butyl putty was used and from memory i think this wasnt a good move either but im open to correction on that. If your units are on putty you will be very lucky if you get them out without breaking any, ive replaced 100's but they were steamed up so didnt matter but easing them out with a flat scraper most broke.

If any units are fitted into timber nowadays they'll either be put in on double sided security tape/neoprene tape or bedded on a small bead of clear silicone then sealed around the edge then the bead pushed on and pinned in.
 
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Yep as i thought, its a John Carr/Boulton & Paul window, the dummy sash will either be stapled in with 50mm staples or nailed in, again 50mm nails, think these windows never saw any glue :D

Just a case of getting some stormproof hinges and some stays and keeps, hinges are generic but as JC/B&C are no longer around you will struggle to get matching stays and keeps, others are a plenty in B&Q and wickes but you'll need to replace all on one window depending on how close the match.

As for the sealed units, in the days these were put in on ordinary linseed putty, it later turned out the linseed oil attacked the double glazed units seal and eventually they misted up, because of this butyl putty was used and from memory i think this wasnt a good move either but im open to correction on that. If your units are on putty you will be very lucky if you get them out without breaking any, ive replaced 100's but they were steamed up so didnt matter but easing them out with a flat scraper most broke.

If any units are fitted into timber nowadays they'll either be put in on double sided security tape/neoprene tape or bedded on a small bead of clear silicone then sealed around the edge then the bead pushed on and pinned in.


I am obliged for your time and guidance. Most of the windows I have salvaged have hinges and some have handles. I will have a trawl around In-Excess and places like that to see what I can find to match up.
 
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