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Internet - router to RJ45 data grid socket

Discussion in 'Audio Visual' started by sparkticus, 26 Jun 2011.

  1. sparkticus

    sparkticus

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    Hi there, I have been asked to connect a short run (3 meters) of existing CAT5e cable from a router (under stairs) to an RJ45 data grid wall socket in an adjacent room.

    Cable is already in place, just needs terminating.

    Questions

    -Do I separate out the 8 cores and wire each end one-for-one?

    -Can anyone point me to an decent insertion tool?

    Thank you
     
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  3. gblades

    gblades

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    http://www.amazon.co.uk/KRONE-Type-Punch-Telephone-Insertion/dp/B000Q84THG

    The RJ45 socket is normally marked with the colours of the wires which should be connected to them so fairly easy to follow. Try to keep the wire pairs twisted together as close as you can to the socket as it stops them from picking up any interference.
    I assume you have RJ45 sockets at both ends?
    The cable that was installed should have been solid core which is what is designed to be used with the punch down sockets. You can wire the other end into a RJ45 plug but that type of wire can break if moved about a lot and so its always better to have sockets at both end and get the end user to use a patch cable to connect to the router.
     
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  4. sparkticus

    sparkticus

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    Thank you.

    OK thanks. Just out of interest are these signals driven by a differential driver typically (what I used to call a twisted pair driver)?


    Yes, I looked at the CAT5e and it is solid so I'll make sure sockets at both ends.
     
  5. gblades

    gblades

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    Correct. The tight twisting helps ensure any interference affects both wires so when the difference is detected at the other end the interference cancels out.

    Pins 1&2 and 3&5 are used for 100mbps. If you use gigabit or POE (power over ethernet) then the other two pairs are used aswell.
    If you are likely to be terminating a few of these cables in the future it might be worth getting a cheap tester just to make sure all 4 pairs are connected properly as a normal network test will only test 2 of them. Something like http://www.amazon.co.uk/Draper-40420-LAN-Tester/dp/B000PJ8OJA/ would be sufficient.

    You can get more expensive ones but they are not needed unless you are running lots of very long cables. We paid a few hundred pounds for ours and it has 8 termination sockets so you plug them onto the end of the cables and at the other end you can tell which is which and that is great if you are running lots of cables at the same time. It can also detect capacitance and use that to detect the length of the cable so if there is a break or short you know roughly where it is. Its complete overkill for home installations though. http://www.test-um-europe.com/products/testing_&_certification/nt750/nt750.htm
     
  6. Paul_C

    Paul_C

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    10Base-T & 100Base-TX wiring use two pairs on 1 & 2 plus 3 & 6, not 3 & 5. Although not as common, and obviously it needs supporting hardware, it's also possible to run a 100Mbps connection using 100Base-T4 wiring, which uses all four pairs and will run on CAT3 cabling.

    And we're fighting a losing battle it seems, but these are not RJ-45 jacks.
     
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  7. sparkticus

    sparkticus

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    I know but RJ45 is a term I understand along with many people on the planet. I have been party to the thread on plugtops and don't want to open more cans of worms :rolleyes:
     
  8. Paul_C

    Paul_C

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    That's for sure! But being from a telecoms background it just grates on me to see that misuse and not at least make the point for anyone else reading a thread that computer network jacks aren't RJ-45.

    And speaking of cans of worms, there's the T568A vs. T568B wiring debate, which to my mind often seems to provoke far more fervent arguments than it deserves, given that the end result will still work perfectly well with all equipment whichever standard is followed.
     
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