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Kitchen doors disaster

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by andemz, 2 Oct 2008.

  1. andemz

    andemz

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    Hope you can help. My father, in haste has gone and drilled all of the handles for the doors for his kitchen cupboards on the same side. The doors cost £500, they are light oak from B&Q. Is it possible to fill the holes in with some form of light oak veneer filler.

    Please advise, if you know of a product please let me know.

    Kind regards

    Andemz
     
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  3. SproutsDad

    SproutsDad

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    Hi, Do you mean the 3mm or so holes for the handles? I made similar mistake on one drawer. Managed to reposition that lone handle to cover it up. Can you perhaps play with reversing doors - left to right, turn upside down etc? Doors are completely reversible. Maybe some doors can open the other way as the 32mm hinge holes are common both sides and those can be swapped.
    This might minimise the impact, you then only fill those that can't be swapped around and make those where not so easily seen, low down etc. I don't know without seeing your layout. But the level of success with filling will depend on the type of finish - real wood or plastic veneer - and the match of filler. It will probably always show but being innovative it can be minimised. Good luck, and you're not alone! All too easily done. A good rule, 'measure twice, cut once'.
     
  4. xerxes

    xerxes

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    A filler won't have any grain pattern, of course. But you should be able to find a reasonable colour match. I would use Brummer stopping, and rub down very carefully to try to avoid harming the finish around the hole.

    Another approach would be to enlarge the holes sufficiently to accept wooden plugs. Make the plugs from a suitable piece of oak, tap them in place with the grain aligned and shave them flush very carefully. But it would be difficult to do this successfully every time unless you've already had a lot of practice, as the grain of oak can easily tear out below the surface.

    If you can't adopt the solution suggested by SproutsDad, I'd go for filler and accept that you'll always be able to see where the holes were. After you've stopped looking for them you'll forget they're there.
     
  5. SproutsDad

    SproutsDad

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    Xerxes is so right. Usually it is only you that notice these things and once you have made the best that can be of the situation you forget about it and just use the kitchen. You have to point out the error to most people othwerwise whey won't notice.

    I did see another reply to this query, though not in this thread (!) where the advice was to use coloured waxes which can be colour matched by mixing them and applying hot.
     
  6. Bloggsyboy

    Bloggsyboy

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    Another tip is to use a fine colour pencil or even a fine craft paint brush to "draw" the grain pattern on top of the filler. If a grain line runs across the hole and you make it a continous line instead of stopping at the hole then starting again, most people won't spot it.
     
  7. gregers

    gregers

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    you might be able to use 'liberon wax sticks'.
     
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  9. woodfinishes1877

    woodfinishes1877

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    Liberon Wax sticks are good, you could also try Konig Hardwax which is melted into the holes and then you use a spirit based graining pens to do the fine graining detail? As it's name suggests Hardwax is used on areas which might experience wear and tear. Otherwise I'd go for the Liberon Wax (which is softer and easier to apply) or Konig's Softwaxes which come in a far larger range of shades. The aim is to find a wax that is nearly bang on to the shade you need and Konig's waxes come in 40 shades as opposed to Liberon's 16.

    Hope this helps.
     
  10. gregers

    gregers

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    you could also try Konig Hardwax

    woodfinishes,is this similar to the(i think thats what i mean lol) shellac sticks ive used in the past?????heat them up and drip the contents over the bit that needs repairing,then gently pair off??????
     
  11. awbcm

    awbcm

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  12. gregers

    gregers

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    wow awbcm thats some kind of repair kit ;)
     
  13. awbcm

    awbcm

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