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Loft Conversion Existing Ceiling Joists & New Floor Beam

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by Cavester, 27 Aug 2014.

  1. Cavester

    Cavester

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    Hi All,

    I am currently drafting up some plans to convert my loft space.

    The house is a 1930's semi detached with hipped roof and single king post and tie beam running front to rear of property at the hip to ridge line. The total span is 7m but supported by a load bearing wall half way beneath (so 2 x 3.5m clear spans).

    Unlike other properties I have managed to find on the internet and examples for installing floor beams, all of my existing ceiling joists run from the tie beam to the party wall and tie beam to gable. The only examples I have managed to find have been where the ceiling beams run front to back of house, which is not the same as mine.

    The question I am trying to answer and hope that someone out there would be kind enough to assist; in my situation how would I best design the new floor beams? I have added a clip of the existing loft layout and a section showing the king post and existing ceiling joists coming off...



    I have a number of ideas I am thinking...

    1. Install steel C Sections bolted back to back the length of the tie beam therefore enable new floor joists to be spanned from this parallel to the exiting ceiling joists.

    2. Beef up the tie beam by bolting wood beams either side and length of the tie beam therefore enable new floor joists to be spanned from this parallel to the exiting ceiling joists. (not sure what size/strength would be needed here).

    3. Use a steel fletch and wood to beef up tie beam therefore enable new floor joists to be spanned from this parallel to the exiting ceiling joists (also not sure what size/strength would be needed here).

    I would prefer option 2 as this would mean I would not need to use steel.

    Am I thinking about this in the right way? Opinions and experience appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Cavester

    Cavester

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    No one have any ideas or where else I may best seek guidance?

    Thanks.
     
  3. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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    You may as well find a one man band structural engineer and chat with them as in any case BC will expect calcs from an SE or other suitably qualified person. Though be careful in your choice as some are more 'progressive' than others.

    You thought of doing a hip to gable conversion? You know planning is very unlikely to be required?
     
  4. Cavester

    Cavester

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    Thanks.

    I work for a large multidisciplinary engineering firm so obtaining calcs is not an issue once I understand the best option for the floor installation with the roof configuration I have, which is seemingly unique!?

    However the structural engineers I work with are used to designing multi million pound stadiums with heavy steel and not loft conversions so you would be surprised at the head scratching at a seemingly simple job like this!

    Yes the hip to gable should come under permitted development which is part of the plan.

    Thanks,

    Lee.
     
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