New skool phone wiring

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1:​

Currently I have an NTE5 with an ADSL faceplate. BT hub plugged in to the faceplate, and a cable emerging from the NTE5 to a junction box from which extension sockets are wired.

I'm guessing that most of what an NTE5 does will be redundant after the analogue service is switched off, with the broadband modem providing VoIP support for analogue phones/extension sockets, so is there/will there be a smaller/neater alternative with just an RJ11 socket for the modem?


2:​

I want to extend the incoming phone cable - the drop wire enters the house in what is now a dreadful place to have a master socket and all the extensions wired to, so I want to move the NTE5 somewhere more convenient. Cabling & joint will be indoors. OK to use one of the pairs in either phone, or ethernet, cable? (2nd option is because I'm not sure if I have enough phone cable, but I've definitely got enough Cat5.)

[Yes, I know that if Openreach catch me I'll be tie-wrapped to the outside of the BT Tower and left to rotate for a few days].
 
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When the analogue phone service is switched off you will no longer need the nte5 as indoors will be an ont that converts the fibre to connect to the router via a cat 6 cable. Your phone(s) will then plug into the back of the router. There are ways to connect your internal wiring the router such that you can still plug a phone in to any existing sockets.


as you state you have a junction box that all the extension wiring is connected to you are already half way there according to the video...
 
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When the analogue phone service is switched off you will no longer need the nte5 as indoors will be an ont
No there won't, at least not until Openreach make FTTP compulsory. The analogue switch off will intially leave the existing copper wiring in place, it's just that it will only be delivering VDSL not VDSL & POTS.

Hence my Q about whether we are going to see a smaller master socket.

as you state you have a junction box that all the extension wiring is connected to you are already half way there according to the video...
Yup - I just need to supply the junction box from the BS 6312 socket on the back of the modem rather from terminals inside the NTE5.

But the master socket and the JB are in a wrong place - I want to move them to a right place, hence my Q about extending the from the incoming drop cable.
 
I’ve just renewed my broadband contract and they are sending me a phone adaptor. Apparently my phone will plug into that and that will plug into my router but what will happen to those oldies that rely on a phone to connect to the emergency services, don’t have a mobile and don’t have a modem or those that have a modem but no phone in a power cut?
 
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I'm still with BT for phone & BB, and the BT hub has a BS 6312 socket on the back to plug a phone in. Of course like a lot of people my hub is not where, or even near, where I'd want a phone, hence wanting to connect extension socket(s) to the phone port on the hub.

smart_hub_2_ports.png


No adapter needed. Other BB modems may vary, but were hard-wired phones more popular than it seems they are I'd expect competing products would need to be made to also allow a phone to just plug in. What make is your "router", and what does the adapter plug into?

BT do flog adapters - they look like PLT devices but they're analogue-DECT converters so you can have as many analogue phones around the house as you're prepared to give up power sockets for.

I'm an oldie, I guess, but I do have a mobile phone. I've also got a DECT phone. I don't (yet :( ) have a summon-assistance device linked to an analogue phone, but I expect that if they aren't here already it won't be long before there are Bluetooth ones to connect to mobiles.

I don't rely on a landline to connect to emergency services, any more than everybody ought to, if they have any sense (i.e. last resort rely). The problem with only having phones which need an electrical supply to operate is that if you lose power, you lose the phone, which is why (at least when I bought mine) DECT phones come with advice to keep at least one traditional analogue phone.

Shameful 1: What BT have done is to force everybody to have a system which stops working the instant there's a power cut unless people at their own expense provide battery backup for their modem.

Shameful 2: They've also done away with the power-supply resilience that POTS has, so even if someone does have a BBU for their modem, will there even be a VoIP service available if there's a power cut?

And the problem with relying on a cellphone is even if the service isn't directly affected by a power cut, in the event of a significant "disasters" mobile phone networks often collapse because of the sheer number of people trying to make calls.

My mum would have been one of those with no broadband, no modem, and a "help I've fallen over" button about her person linked to a phone which would work through a series of stored numbers to call neighbours, carers, family, and ultimately 999.

I'm not a luddite, but I am good at thinking through "yeah, but what about"s, and either BT are hopeless at that or they DGA*.
 
You can get an adapter from BT that plugs into a power socket by your phone.
Yes, I know.

BT do flog adapters - they look like PLT devices but they're analogue-DECT converters



The phone ( or possibly your extension wiring) plugs into the adapter which talks to the hub over WiFi

Extension socket wiring might work.

Might not.

But starting the extension socket chain by hardwiring to a plug into the router is no biggie.
 
Yes, I know.







Extension socket wiring might work.

Might not.

But starting the extension socket chain by hardwiring to a plug into the router is no biggie.
depends if you have extension wiring where the router is. My extension wiring branches from the filtered side of the nte5 down in the hall but the router is upstairs on a separate extension from the unfiltered side of the master socket.

Otherwise, I'd do as you say.
 
Extension socket wiring might work.

Might not.

But starting the extension socket chain by hardwiring to a plug into the router is no biggie.
Extension wiring connected to the phone socket on the hub does work as that is what I have done
 
Extension wiring connected to the phone socket on the hub does work
Yes, I know.

What I'm uncertain of is if extension wiring connected to the phone socket on a DECT adapter would work. But then I don't want to do that, so it doesn't matter to me.
 
The change away from exchange powered phone lines is not just BT it is industry wide. So wish people would stop blaming BT for every evolution to new systems. Be better to blame OfCom who really have caused this F*** up by stopping the change BT planned to do from 1992 onwards.
Guess people will be whinging next that have to dial the full eleven digits to landline call their neighbour next...

If the service provider is pushed they will supply a battery back-up unit.
 
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The change away from exchange powered phone lines is not just BT it is industry wide. So wish people would stop blaming BT for every evolution to new systems.
I will rightly blame any company for making new things which are worse than the old things they are withdrawing.



Be better to blame OfCom who really have caused this F*** up by stopping the change BT planned to do from 1992 onwards.
Will that be the Ofcom which didn't exist until the very end of 2003, or a different Ofcom which had existed in secret 11 years before then?
 
Much easer in Australia !

See
at 3:15 t0 3:30.

After that, disconnect the incoming "Landline" at its first "point-of-entry"
and then
plug the other end of that Grey "Telephone Cable"
(modular connector 6P4C plug - often termed RJ11, from the Bell Telephone nomenclature of "Registered Jack 11")
into any nearby existing Telephone Socket - using an "adaptor", if necessary.

However, it may be necessary to run a "pair" from an existing Telephone Socket to a nearby 6P2C Socket, depending upon where the new "Modem" is located.

I have done this "Conversion" on three premises so far and my electrician Son often does this for his "clients".


Takes about 10 minutes, if the existing sockets are within reach.

(Note in the video that, at about 3:25, there is a view which shows a "SIM".
If the Australian "National Broadband Network" (NBN) "goes down", the modem will automatically connect - via Telstra's 4G network.)
 
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In case needed by others I wore a guide here...

 
I’ve just renewed my broadband contract and they are sending me a phone adaptor. Apparently my phone will plug into that and that will plug into my router but what will happen to those oldies that rely on a phone to connect to the emergency services, don’t have a mobile and don’t have a modem or those that have a modem but no phone in a power cut?

My 'new' contract with my existing provider (Vodafone) started today. I still had a dial tone on my phone but I couldn’t dial out and when I rang in, I heard a ring tone but the phone wasn’t ringing. Plugged the phone into the adaptor they sent me, plugged the other end into the modem and everything was working once more.

I'm now reliant on power to work my modem to work my phone and I wonder whether I can get a power supply with the same Jack plug that will just plug into the modem in case of a power cut?

Edit: I've just realised I have been reliant on power to make phone calls for years as I have a cordless phone with two other cordless extensions! I never even considered getting a backup power supply for that. Who still has an old style 'ordinary' type, plug in, dial or button type phone?
 
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