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Nightmare kitchen fitting

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by Mary1, 30 Jul 2019.

  1. Tigger90

    Tigger90

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    Thank you :) all made from scrap wood too so even better !!
    Yeah, I would start sanding at the back to see how it goes so if it doesn’t you can always place something there!
    I reckon a bit of sanding and you will be fine. I wonder what it has been finished with? That might be the only pain to find the finish you can put on it!
     
    Last edited: 30 Jul 2019
  2. conny

    conny

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    Do you have such a thing as a Vernier caliper? If you have you will know what it looks like, if not then you could try this method on your scrap piece.
    Cut a piece off your scrap one then lay this on something, (a number of sheets of paper or card will do), so when you lay it next to the other piece of scrap it is about the same height difference as shown on the worktop. Sand the raised piece of scrap until it feels about level with the non sanded piece. Remove the paper and examine how thick the remaining layer of veneer is, then lay both pieces side by side.
    This will give you an idea of how much you would need to sand off the worktop. It's your judgment to decide if the worktop piece is thick enough to withstand this sanding.

    Bit of a long way to find out but it may save you time and money in the long run if you think it will work.
    BTW, sand in the direction of the grain, not across it or you will never get the scratches out.
     
  3. conny

    conny

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    Do you have such a thing as a Vernier caliper? If you have you will know what it looks like, if not then you could try this method on your scrap piece.
    Cut a piece off your scrap one then lay this on something, (a number of sheets of paper or card will do), so when you lay it next to the other piece of scrap it is about the same height difference as shown on the worktop. Sand the raised piece of scrap until it feels about level with the non sanded piece. Remove the paper and examine how thick the remaining layer of veneer is, then lay both pieces side by side.
    This will give you an idea of how much you would need to sand off the worktop. It's your judgment to decide if the worktop piece is thick enough to withstand this sanding.

    Bit of a long way to find out but it may save you time and money in the long run if you think it will work.
    BTW, sand in the direction of the grain, not across it or you will never get the scratches out.
     
  4. Mary1

    Mary1

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    Brilliant idea, in will try that. Think the only way I will resolve this is if I try myself, lacking a bit of confidence but with all the great advice everyone is giving me hopefully I will manage. Thanks so much for taking the time to help!
     
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  5. Mary1

    Mary1

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    Well done you it is lovely thanks for explaining. I think they sell oil where I bought the worktop so assume I just need that but probably apply it to the whole worktop?
     
  6. Tigger90

    Tigger90

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    If it’s like a top oil than has sunk it rather than sitting on top like a varnish you should be able to blend it in?
     
  7. conny

    conny

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    Patience is the key. Take your time and stop frequently to see how it looks. Wipe it with a dry duster each time you stop so you get to see the true finish/depth.
    As it is a wood veneer I would suggest using oil to colour/protect it. This is especially helpful in wet areas such as around the sink where it is most likely to stain. With oil it can easily be treated every couple of weeks but one of the secrets is to mop up and dry any spills immediately. So many people think they can leave standing water because the oil will prevent any marking. Not quite true because you do need to help it by keeping as dry as possible.
    Good luck and let us know how you get on.
     
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  8. opps

    opps

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    According to the website, the tops are finished with Danish oil. You can buy that in many DIY sheds and most decorators' merchants.

    When working with solid worktops, I normally apply 3 or 4 coats.

    Use gloves though, the stuff is very sticky. I apply the oil with a paper cloth and use another paper cloth to wipe away the excess. Scott is my prefered brand.

    When finished I soak the cloths with water. Never scrunch up the cloths and throw them in to an open top bin- there is a real risk of them spontaneously combusting.

    I would recommend borrowing a random orbital sander, it will be much faster than hand sanding.
     
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