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Please consider this insurance scenario.

Discussion in 'General Cars' started by Burnerman, 3 Jan 2016.

  1. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    So - you've flown to Spain to get pi$$ed for a fortnight.
    You picked up your Fiat Panda from the airport, and paid for complete insurance cover, collision damage waiver, the works.
    Unfortunately, said Fiat has been shunted from behind when you parked it at your hotel.....no witness, no admissions, nothing.
    You report back to the airport and naturally enough, you lose some of your deposit.
    Do you tell your own insurers when you get back to Blighty? Either legally, or morally?
    John :)
     
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  3. Dave54

    Dave54

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    From your own insurer's point of view, I expect they'd say that you have to report all claims that "you" have had.
    You know that if you ever had a major claim in the future, and they found you out, they'd use it a a get out.
    Just my take of course, but that's the reason it wouldn't rest easy with me.
     
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  4. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Thanks for the reply Dave (y)
    So.....do you tell your Blighty insurers or not? (Wondering if there are any insurance brokers on here.)
    John :)
     
  5. Dave54

    Dave54

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    I would myself John, but only because I'd want to make sure I was covered. At the end of the day you don't know who talks to who. It's all Europe after all's said and done.
    Will it make any difference to your insurance costs if you do declare it?
    Good luck with it.
     
  6. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Just a scenario at the moment Dave, but as I hire a motor abroad about 3 times a year, statistically something will happen some day!
    Personally I'd be inclined to say nowt, but I'd really like to know what's correct, and any consequences of ignoring such an event.
    John :)
     
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  8. Himaginn

    Himaginn

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    No, I would not mention it, based on your scenario.
    Your contract was with the hire car company, not their insurance. I would imagine that hire car companies have a few of these minor scrapes, but how many do they actually claim for? If they do, are the driver details included? They probably have a sizable excess. When I've hired cars in Europe, I've had to show drivers licence, but I can not remember if they take copies, details, etc.
    So the chance of it showing up, IMO, is pretty slim. There must be quite a few John Burnermans in Europe.
    If it did and it became a problem, I'd plead ignorance on the basis that you were not the driver at the time, you are pretty sure the car was already damaged when you picked it up, but you never took photos or checked that much so could not prove your assertion, or it must have been already damaged because you had no idea when the damage occurred and you were definitely not in any accident.

    Isn't the question: " have you had any accidents?" or "have you made any claims?" The answer must be "No!"
    Also they may ask have you had any previous policies cancelled or void? The answer again is "NO!"

    There is also classifications of non-disclosure: deliberate, reckless, innocent or inadvertent. http://www.gocompare.com/car-insurance/declarations-and-non-disclosures/

    A little quote from that website above:"The law changed in 2013 to reflect the way in which the FOS (Financial Ombudsman) had been viewing this area and puts the emphasis on the consumer being honest and careful, rather than 100% accurate."
     
    Last edited: 4 Jan 2016
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  9. Himaginn

    Himaginn

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  10. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Pretty much my own sentiments really.....even if you have guarded no claims, you are considered to be a higher risk if you have an incident and your premiums are likely to increase anyway. No escape!
    Just remembered....I have 3 points now, and haven't disclosed that to anyone. Better get cracking!
    John :)
     
  11. empip

    empip

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    I would imagine non disclosure could result in future no cover situation, given we virtually all have assets of one kind or another, a private claim could be ruinous.

    Another point... Reporting to Police.
    https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/d...ce/you-re-involved-in-a-road-accident-abroad/

    Someone else deciding between careful, honest and accuracy - doesn't fill me with confidence regarding the risk of non-disclosure.

    -0-
     
    Last edited: 4 Jan 2016
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  12. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Just for info....
    If anyone needs to inform their insurers of any convictions, you need to check out your driving licence details on line (google my driving licence.gov)
    You need your driving licence number and your national insurance number too.
    In my case, they'll add the cost of the conviction (SP30) to the next renewal premium, and for me its £20.
    John :)
     
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