Removing laminate worktop and refitting

Discussion in 'Building' started by jimjones235, 5 Jan 2018.

  1. jimjones235

    jimjones235

    Joined:
    5 Aug 2013
    Messages:
    30
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Monmouthshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Simple question really, we have an L shaped kitchen with laminate worktops joined in the corner, I need to remove one of the base cabinets (the end one 600 wide) and replace with integrated dishwasher and end panel. I was hoping to do this without removing the worktop, but it might prove tricky as the units are probably attached to the wall, ideally I'd also shimmy the corner unit half an inch over to give a bit more manuavering room for an end panel. If the units are attached to the wall then I think I'll have to remove the worktop to get access to unscrew them. So my question is this, how easy is it to remove and refit worktops, hopefully they are just bolted together (and obvs screwed to cabinets), but I'm guessing also glued, is it madness to expect to be able to undo the bolts leaver it off do what needs to be done, reglue and bolt, then screw back through from the cabinets beneath?
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. pete50

    pete50

    Joined:
    19 Mar 2017
    Messages:
    785
    Thanks Received:
    155
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The worktops should not be glued down. They should be screwed from underneath. The problem will be the join. If it is a mason's mitre then it will be a very fine and precise joint. This should be glued and also could have biscuits holding it. Even if you undo the bolts you may not be able to get the joint apart and if you did manage to split a mason's mitre it's not likely you could get it back together again with the same presicion.
     
  4. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

    Joined:
    22 Jul 2016
    Messages:
    4,771
    Thanks Received:
    771
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I doubt that they are glued to the cabinets, normally the cabinets are screwed to the wall- you may be able to access those screws with the worktop in situ. The worktop is probably screwed to the cabinets. Lifting an "L" will be difficult and it may break at the join.

    I had to do something similar to what you are doing after replacing a slimline dishwasher with a built in.
    I had to lift the worktop to gain access and used a motorcycle scissor lift to jack it up. Then move 3 cabinets 1/2 inch to the left.

    Depending on your kitchen units, you can unscrew the legs and lower the cabinets as well as raise the worktop.
     
  5. jimjones235

    jimjones235

    Joined:
    5 Aug 2013
    Messages:
    30
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Monmouthshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Apologies, I meant that the joint may be glued, not that the worktop was glued to the units.. ;)

    That was my worry, if the glued joint is very strong it would be hard to break without leaving some residue/lumps of chipboard... Sliding the cupboard out won't be a problem, it's just if the cupboards are attached to the wall then getting access might be impossible without moving the worktop... It hadn't occured to me to try and move the whole L as one, it's not actually an L as at the other end there is a return so it's a U with a 3m run being the middle section!!

    Interestingly the other aspect to this is that I'm going to have to do inventive things with the sink - the inset sink currently sits over the unit I'm taking out with the drainer over the neighbouring one, so I'm going to get a new sink with a bigger outline, rotate it and cut the new (bigger) hole so the drainer sits over the dishwasher!! It may be easier to replace this section of worktop, but that would mean rebuilding the masons mitre on the existing worktop... unless anyone has any suggestions?
     
  6. Ian H

    Ian H

    Joined:
    14 Sep 2010
    Messages:
    7,037
    Thanks Received:
    862
    Location:
    Rochdale
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Destroy the 600mm unit.
     
  7. Don't touch the worktop, but don't quite follow Ians advice (unless necessary). Undo any screws to the adjoining cabinets and the worktop, screw the legs up under the cabinet, and then, using a little bit of brute force, pull the unit out and see if you can rip the screws out of the wall - if that doesn't work, then go with Ians suggestion - but the screws are never that solid into either the wall, or into the units themselves. When you put it back in place, just add a few more screws to the adjoining cabinet to keep it in place.
     
  8. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
  9. Sponsored Links
Loading...

Share This Page