Replace and wooden floor to solid or not?

Discussion in 'Building' started by Simonj1, 18 Jan 2021.

  1. Simonj1

    Simonj1

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    Hi

    I’m after some advise if anyone can please help.

    I’m getting an extension in an old Edwardian house . The dining room has the original wooden floor and we extending off it to make a bigger diner. I was thinking of getting the wooden floor replaced with a solid floor along with the solid floor in the new extension. The main reason I wanted a solid floor is to help with insulation and keep it warmer as it’s an old house. But I have been advised that that not that much heat is lost though the floor and it was suggested I should keep that floor and save money and maybe look at investing In money better radiators and insulating the walls with insulated plaster boards.

    many thoughts? You help is appreciated! Thanks
     
  2. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    10-15% of heat is lost through a floor. But other considerations are not just the actual the draughts from a timber floor (air leakage) but also the cold spots causing lower air temperatures in the room above, which then causes air to move like a draught. "Better" radiators may not help and can just compound things, whilst increasing the gas bills. Likewise for wall insulation - that will help things generally, but may not compensate for a cold floor. It's all about having a proper assesment of the room, and all options working as one

    Whilst having building work done its the opportune time to sort out that floor, and it may be that just insulating the timber floor will be the most cost effective and better option. But there may be other reasons to change it for concrete - damp or future damp the joists in the wall.

    Also, don't rely on the builders advice alone - he has a vested interest in doing or not doing certain works.

    If you are insulating existing walls, be sure that you use as much and as efficient insulation as possible. It's a lot of disruption and cost, so it's best to make sure you get the most gain long term.
     
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  4. JP_

    JP_

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    Also consider electrics and plumbing - I thought about swapping my timber floors for insulation+concrete, but chose not to as it would mean changing my electrics and plumbing - I didn't want to risk just burying everything!
     
  5. Lower

    Lower

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    Be aware that you probably won't have much of a damp proof course in the walls. Whatever solution you go for, make sure that this is considered with the new extension.

    If you keep the suspended floor in the original room, make sure it is still ventilated when the new extension floor goes in and the new floor doesn't block off the airflow.

    If you choose to replace the suspended wooded floor, make sure you have considered the lack of damproof course in the walls.
     
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  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    most of the cold from a wooden floor is draughts, not conduction or convection, and unless your boards are rather gappy, a lot of them come up the gap under the floorboards. you will see black stains on the wall and carpet edges where dirt blows up.

    You can stuff mineral wool (loft) insulation between the joists, taking care not to obstruct airflow through the airbricks (clean them out). It is very inexpensive. Does not need to be cut precisely as it will stuff into irregular gaps. Even doing just the edges of the room will make a worthwhile improvement.

    If you are taking up the boards or have access underneath, you can pack between all the joists. Clear up all rubbish from the void, and consider leaving a trap for access, well away from the door and traffic paths so it will not squeak much.

    Ventilation of the void will also evaporate and blow away some damp out of the walls.

    It is worth doing if you are getting under the floor for some other reason, such as plumbing and wiring, or throwing chipboard in the skip. people usually staple garden netting to the joists to prevent the wool flopping out of place.

    20180108_172001.jpg

    Much less effort and expense than taking up the floor to lay concrete.
     
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