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Replacing 6ft Wooden fence with an evergreen hedge

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by Twofingertyper, 18 Nov 2015.

  1. Twofingertyper

    Twofingertyper

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    Hi all,

    In my back garden I currently have responsiblity for 20ft of 6ft high fencing (on two sides) the expenses related to keeping this in good condition and upright in high winds (as we live on a hill) is currently something that causes me no end of sadness.

    Is there a standard evergreen hedge that people use as a boundary? Both me and the neighbours have kids, dogs and they have chickens... so I'd want a reasonable boundry that wasn't too prickly... I imagine that the width of the hedge will come into play at some point (people can be so precious about boundries, even when they get their fencing for free) but that's a bridge I can cross when it comes to it.

    Thanks for any suggestions,
    A windswept TFT
     
  2. foxhole

    foxhole

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  4. r896neo

    r896neo

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    If you want it fully evergreen and its very exposed then probably a laurel, either common/cherry laurel or the nicer but more expensive portugal laurel. They grow in a more shrub type form and so remain strong at 6ft plus as opposed to small leaf plants like privet which will be more spindly structure and perhaps be more subject to flopping in the wind.

    It will likely need to be 2-3ft wide to form a decent 6ft hedge.

    In my experience privet will drop lots of leaves and are almost semi evergreen in an exposed location. Common laurel can be subject to slight wind burn but dont drop leaves as readily.

    Griselinia will be fastest growing and as effective as laurels but are technically not fully hardy if it gets very far below zero where you are. Also i dont like their colour.:)
     
  5. mattylad

    mattylad

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    Can you please advise how\why you have "responsibility" for it?
    What is it that forces you to be responsible for it?
     
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  7. Twofingertyper

    Twofingertyper

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    Thanks for the recommendations - quite exposed to the elements here, so a hardy laurel sounds like a good option, will see if I can find a local garden centre that stocks some so I can take a look at them first hand and see what I prefer...

    Mattylad - other than the the joys of 'keeping house' - nothing, there's no hard and fast rule, I could just string up some chain link fencing and meet my obligations; but that wouldn't be very pretty...
     
  8. DIYnot Local

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