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Restoring antique pine kitchen table

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by Estrella, 20 Feb 2009.

  1. Estrella

    Estrella

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    Hey folks,
    I managed to snap up a bargain yesterday and got an antique pine farmhouse kitchen table. Trouble is there are a few ring marks from cups etc and could do with a general freshen up. The wood is natural with no varnish on it, and I'd like to keep it that way. Should I just sand it with a mild grain sandpaper 120 grit or less? Should I be treating it with anything ?

    Thanks
     
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  3. trazor

    trazor

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    Without seeing your table top, its difficult to judge what size grit to start with.
    But I once restored a grandfather clock, and started with 60 grit, working up to to 1200 grit to give a polished finish.
    Do not jump from a coarse grade to a fine grade, work your way through the grit sizes until you achieve the finish you require.

    I prefer using aluminium oxide paper.

    To finish, use Danish oil or Tung oil, do not over apply either.
     
  4. Estrella

    Estrella

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    Thanks Trazor, appologies but the pics are not wonderful.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  5. Symptoms

    Symptoms

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    Box - your "antique" table may appear to be "natural with no varnish on it" but it's likely to have been waxed in it's previous life. If you attempt to sand the surface you'll end-up with something that looks 'new' thus undermining the reasons you bought it. To keep that old look just apply some more furniture wax (not the spray stuff) - maybe a beeswax type - and buff it up and learn to live with it's 'lived-in-look'. Little local areas can be 'fixed' by applying the wax with fine steel wool then buff - the s/wool abrades the surface slightly thus helping to remove marks (test this technique on the underside first).

    If you really want to strip it back and start again re-post for instructions. There are lots of ways to do this.
     
  6. Estrella

    Estrella

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    Thanks Symtoms, valid point re the making it look new again. I seem to remember my old man using wax and wire wool years ago. I think that is probably the best course of action.

    Cheers
     
  7. SgtSiff

    SgtSiff

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    Agreed with symptoms. If the wire wool doesn't work on the tougher marks, try a few drops of thinners on a cloth, go with the grain as if you were trying to blend something in, and remove any excess. I use fiddes and briwax at work, both very good natural waxes.
     
  8. DIYnot Local

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