Rotary demolition hammer reccommendation

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by markocosic, 1 Mar 2013.

  1. markocosic

    markocosic

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    Hello,

    I have a large chimney that needs to come down - wants a kango or similar.

    I have a number of cores to drill, up to 162 mm through engineering brick to both cavity leaves - did a couple with a standard DIY mains drill with lots of cool down time, but then ragged the gearbox to pieces when one snatched.

    An SDS hammer drill to complement the cordless JCB Li-ion from B&Q (don't mock - 5 yr warranty...) that I use for almost everything would be handy. Sinking larger holes in confrete, socket boxes etc.


    Will 200-250 buy me a tool that could do all or the above and last? Don't mind heavy, don't mind slow for core drilling, but would rather one monster than 3 crummt tools or money down the drain on rentals.


    Reccomendations on a postcard please!

    Thanks


    oncrete; socket bodes etc.
     
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  3. markocosic

    markocosic

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    Went halves with my brother on with this:

    http://www.toolstop.co.uk/makita-hr...y-hammer-drill-with-quick-change-chuck-p16774

    Drill that's rated for cores (only 80, but 110 should be ok if care taken)
    3-mode (chisellign only) for the chimney
    3-jaw chuck for metalwork/wood
    AVT to not kill hands even if the job does take an age
    Set of Makita SDS bits
    Small enough to use for normal wall drilling unlike the larger 2811F
    3 year warranty

    £250


    Was seriously tempted by this for £120:

    http://www.its.co.uk/pd/D-21200-Makita-Drill-and-Chisel-Bit-Set--SDSplus-Shank-17pce-_MAKD21200.htm

    But decided that £60 extra (shared with brother remember) was worth it for the AVT and 3-Jaw.
     
  4. Norcon

    Norcon

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    You should have hired.
    That makita looks like a toy for a chimney job.

    Its always best to have separate machines for breaking and coring imo.
    Coring is best done with diamonds these days and not tungsten tip.

    Makita make the largest range of breakers and breaker/drillers on the market.
    We have the HM1213C breaker only. Packs 18.6 joules of punching power. Thats enough to break down 35 newton reinforced concrete.

    Still a long way off Rocky Marciano's punching power which was reported to be 1028 joules. :mrgreen:
     
  5. markocosic

    markocosic

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    Doh! I guess patience will be tested...

    I've been using the mexco diamond cores from toolstation rather than tungsten carbide (on that makita 2070) and if your'e slow/careful the combo will do the job. Don't hold the drill too firmly or run it too quickly though; that's the mistake I made with the 54 mm core (not the 162 mm one!) and when the drill snagged it sheared the drive pins rather than kicking the drill around a bit and absorbing the shock load. Gear 1 speed 1.5 for 162 mm, gear 1 speed 3 for 54 mm, and take cooldown breaks with the bit out/speed 5 every minute.
     
  6. twgas

    twgas

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    you should ALWAYS use a drill with a clutch when coring.
     
  7. markocosic

    markocosic

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    It has one. And it's supposed to protect the gearbox. :rolleyes:

    It's not the first time I've maimed that drill to be fair - the clutch died under warranty whilst screwdriving. Something of a disappointment compared with the old Black & Decker that it replaced. (black case, 850W or so, with speed and electronic torque control, bought in the late 80s/early 90s)
     
  8. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

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