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securing straight timber to a cupped window frame for secondary glazing

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by james19000, 18 May 2019.

  1. james19000

    james19000

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    Hi,

    wondered how you might just tackle this issue of securing straight timber to a cupped window frame, in order to add a frame for some secondary glazing.

    [​IMG]

    I was thinking of taking a plane to the straight timber?
     
  2. blup

    blup

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    You could scribe the shape of the frame onto the timber and use a hand or electric plane to remove wood as appropriate

    Blup
     
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  3. james19000

    james19000

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    Thank you Blup,

    that's brilliant,

    just checked out some videos on scribing and that makes perfect sense.

    Thank you
     
  4. KenGMac

    KenGMac

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    james19000, good evening.

    It appears from the image posted that the window is a "Sash and Case" type where the lower sash slides upwards and the reverse occurs to the top sash with ropes and counterweights within the case.

    A couple of questions?

    Was the property constructed [say] pre-1910?
    Does the sash "Rattle" in the frame?

    There are some possible solutions to draughty sash and case windows?

    Ken
     
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  5. james19000

    james19000

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    Hi KenGMac,

    Yes the property was constructed around 1900.

    I refurbished the sash windows last year and the sash doesnt rattle, its slides up and down nice and easy without any rattle.

    Its more to do with noise, since we live next to a road that we wish to explore the secondary glazing option.
     
  6. KenGMac

    KenGMac

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    james19000, good evening, again.

    OK Understood, the sashes as in [relatively] good nick, work and are indeed serviceable.

    The bit of the window you have indicated is called a "Batton Rod" there is a rounded section facing into the room they are fixed using wood screws and 1.5 [Inch] "oval nails"

    it is possible to remove the "Batton Rod" and fit a rectangular piece of timber in its place to which you can then fit the internal secondary glazing frame. fitting and using the rectangular timber will do a couple of things, 1/. make it easier to have as much "contact surface" between the secondary glazing. 2/. you will be able to use a plane to alleviate the cupping you have?

    Careful measurement once the Batton Rod has [temporary] removed will give you an idea of what dimensions of rectangular timber which will replace the Batton Rod? if you see where i am coming from ?

    Ken
     
  7. james19000

    james19000

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    Hi KenGMac,

    ok I am a little confused by Batton rod, I've looked it up and cant seem to find out what your referring too.

    Having looked on google images for parts of a sash window,

    my intention is to fit the secondary glazing profile to the "casing" of the sash windows.
     
  8. KenGMac

    KenGMac

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