Suspended Floor Insulation

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Now this one has been asked a thousand times, so I'm going to put a twist on it.

I have a suspended wooden ground floor. Beneath is just rubble and earth. There's a good through-wind from various air bricks.

Problem is it's bloody draughty and cold.

We had our kitchen floor sanded and the gaps filled and it's made a huge difference to the temp of the room.

The living room on the other hand is carpeted, yet is still draughty and cold, plus there's lots of gaps around the bay window and skirting.

I have read so many posts on whether or not its safe to put insulation between the beams (from underneath as I'm not lifting the floor) and the jury seems to be out on just how likely it is to get condensation appearing between the insulation and the joists/boards.

So, seeing as I can't make a decision with regards to insulating, would it be stupid idea to go under the floor with some silicone sealant and seal between each board? Basically I want to stop the draughts coming up through the carpet and around the edges by the skirting.

Thanks
 
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The jury is not out as you put it, provided the ventilation is adequate and any insulation fitted is up tight against the floor boards there is no danger of condensation. I'm not aware of any such posts indicating confusion with this kind of upgrade.
 
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Thanks for the reply. I've read plenty of other boards and articles, many of which state that the only was to do it is to have a vapour barrier over the entire underfloor, some say the insulating boards cause issues, some don't. Thus, I don't know what to believe.
 
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You must make your decision as to what you believe, I can only reiterate what I have said. As you mentioned there are thousands of threads on this subject on this forum and the methods employed to achieve a successfully result are the same. Adequate ventilation will remove any moist air. Ensure there is not a gap for any moisture to condense in. There is no need for a vapour barrier as the air within the void is continually moving anyway.

Frankly i don't know what other forums you have been on but they are talking crap.
 
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Fair dos. Thing is, I'm on these forums because I don't know what the best option is, so when I see arguments (elsewhere) I don't know what to believe.

But I will take your word that it's ok to do as long as I fill any gaps.
 

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