Teeing off

Joined
19 Feb 2020
Messages
85
Reaction score
3
Country
United Kingdom
I am building a new extension for my parents to live with us to be close to us now that they are in there late 70s. The new extension will need a new hot and cold feed for a small kitchen that will have a sink and a washing machine and an ensuite thst will have a new toilet, basin and electric shower.

What I have in mind for the plumbing is....... The new kitchen will be on the opposite side of the existing kitchen wall which has a mains cold feed coming up under the sink with good pressure! I am thinking off breaking into the 1/2 inch cold feed and teeing off through this wall to feed the new sink and washing machine then continuing on to the new ensuite which is 3.5m away to feed the toilet and hand basin.

For the hot feed, I have a bathroom which is above near the new extension. I can tee off the 3/4 hot pipe to feed the kitchen sink tap then continue on to feed the ensuite hand basin.

For the electric shower I have decided to use a tank fed shower, I can take a half inch feed off the tank in the attic to the new ensuite.

Can anyone see any problems with my method or should I do it differently.
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
8 May 2017
Messages
6,643
Reaction score
1,413
Country
United Kingdom
Sounds like a reasonable plan. What type of tank fed electric shower ?
Is the hot from a vented cylinder ?
 
Joined
11 Jan 2010
Messages
7,608
Reaction score
606
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
Why an electric shower if you have a hot water feed which I assume is heated by a source other than electricity (gas probably). Electricity is approx 4 times the cost of gas per kW hour.
 
Joined
19 Feb 2020
Messages
85
Reaction score
3
Country
United Kingdom
Why an electric shower if you have a hot water feed which I assume is heated by a source other than electricity (gas probably). Electricity is approx 4 times the cost of gas per kW hour.


There's already one shower in the house fed of the hot water which is heated by oil or a multi fuel stove.
 
Joined
19 Feb 2020
Messages
85
Reaction score
3
Country
United Kingdom
Sounds like a reasonable plan. /QUOTE]


I have limited experience with soldering. Just a few times on pipes above ground. Have plenty of experience with plastic push fits(I know I know lol) and compression. Will you these be ok under a screeded floor or should I practice my soldering more. I have worked in houses where compression or push fits haven't failed under floors yet they've been down a few decades.
 

CBW

Joined
26 Sep 2019
Messages
11,527
Reaction score
3,219
Location
North
Country
United Kingdom
No fittings should be concealed including soldered, unless in a purpose made chase/duct, and the pipe can be withdrawn for inspection if needed - This is defined in the water supply (water fittings) regulations 1999.
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
6 May 2010
Messages
1,595
Reaction score
600
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
1. CBW - which schedule to the Water Regulations are you referring to?
2. Taken as you have written it would mean you can't have even soldered joints under floors.
3. I believe the Water Regulations only forbid joints within solid walls, solid floors or underground, unless accessible via a chase or duct or by the removal of surface coverings such as tiles or screed.
 

CBW

Joined
26 Sep 2019
Messages
11,527
Reaction score
3,219
Location
North
Country
United Kingdom
1. CBW - which schedule to the Water Regulations are you referring to?
2. Taken as you have written it would mean you can't have even soldered joints under floors.
3. I believe the Water Regulations only forbid joints within solid walls, solid floors or underground, unless accessible via a chase or duct or by the removal of surface coverings such as tiles or screed.

Sorry my bad :oops:, shall not be embedded is the wording really. However this is what I’m referring to: https://www.waterregsuk.co.uk/downl...flets/para_7_guidance_version_2_july_2014.pdf

Yes, of course you can have them concealed under floorboards.
 
Joined
11 Jan 2013
Messages
5,199
Reaction score
1,091
Location
Durham
Country
United Kingdom
What capacity is your hot water cylinder? Agree with @winston1 , electric showers are generally unsatisfactory at best and expensive to run. If you have the space & decent mains water flow/pressure you could look at a 300l unvented, or 300l vented would work just fine for 2 bathrooms.
Or if you have the space you could put a separate dhw cylinder in for the granny annex (the boiler doesn't care, it's just another heat sink)- & avoid any clashes at bath/shower time.
 
Joined
19 Feb 2020
Messages
85
Reaction score
3
Country
United Kingdom
No fittings should be concealed including soldered, unless in a purpose made chase/duct, and the pipe can be withdrawn for inspection if needed - This is defined in the water supply (water fittings) regulations 1999.


Where I am the regs are different. Soldering is allowed under floors.
 
  • Thanks
Reactions: CBW
Sponsored Links
Top