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Victorian quarry tiles

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by geraldthehamster, 27 Apr 2015.

  1. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    I have a quantity of Victorian red quarry tiles that came out of a kitchen in a terraced house in York. 6 inch by 6 inch by one inch.

    If I lay these on concrete outside, is there any way they won't be spalled to hell after a winter of two freezing and thawing? I know some quarry tiles are frostproof, but I've also seen them laid outdoors and reduced to a latticework of raised cement mortar by the weather.

    Does anyone have any experience of using old quarry tiles outdoors?

    Cheers
    Richard
     
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  3. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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  4. garethpa

    garethpa

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    no experience myself, but have you explored if there are sealants available that can be applied to prevent water ingress? I guess these type of tiles will readily absorb a sealant.
    Also, when they are laid it would be wise to build in a generous fall to ensure efficient run-off to prevent standing water.
     
  5. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    Fall, yes. I wondered about sealing them but read this:

    http://www.buildingconservation.com/articles/tiles/tiles.htm

    "It should be noted that exterior tiling should never be sealed, as it can reduce the frost resistance of the tiles."

    However that seems to be in relation to encaustic and geometric tiles, which might have been higher-fired. Not sure about that.

    I know it's common to use boiled linseed oil on quarry tiles indoors, but I don't know if this would work out of doors.

    Cheers
    Richard
     
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  7. TheVictorian

    TheVictorian

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    I think the 6x6 ones would spall as they are essentially like bricks. The smaller ones are ok outside from my experience.

    I wouldn't bother trying to seal them as moisture could get into them from the underside and still cause damage in a heavy frost.
     
  8. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    Thanks. I've got some 9 inch ones lying around outside - they certainly aren't frost proof.

    Shame really. I have about 6 m2 of 6 inch tiles that I bought for indoors, but I don't plan to use them there now. They would look good outside the back door. Possibly only for a short time though ... :unsure:

    Cheers
    Richard
     
  9. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    Looks like I'll be buying Ruabon Reds again, then. Beautiful in the sun, but horrendously expensive.
     
  10. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    I've just come across my own post while Googling this issue again ;)

    I wonder if the potential problem would be made better or worse by using a DPM under the concrete bed on which I would be laying them. It would stop moisture coming from below, but would also trap any coming from above.

    Cheers
    Richard
     
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