Water pooling on paving slabs

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I have this issue that water keeps building up in this area whenever I try cleaning the tiles. It’s such a headache. First we had issue with the drainage but I’ve sorted that now. Is there any way on getting this water to build up here ?
 

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I think you mean that you are applying water from a hose or bucket and it does not drain away. Is that right?

Or do you mean water is appearing from some other source (e.g. a drainpipe or leak)?

How did you "sort out the drainage?"

it looks to me like the bottom of the fence panels is standing in the puddle. This will accelerate rot.
 
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I think you mean that you are applying water from a hose or bucket and it does not drain away. Is that right?

Or do you mean water is appearing from some other source (e.g. a drainpipe or leak)?

How did you "sort out the drainage?"

it looks to me like the bottom of the fence panels is standing in the puddle. This will accelerate rot.

Yes I’m applying water and it is not draining away. Any way of sorting this issue ?
 
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You could lift the three slabs that picture show as having sunk one side,level and see it the problem is resolved before spending money.

One other thing dig out the drainage chips, try to lay small dia pipes at an angle into the garden to assist drainage replace chippings.

Other members may have better ideas
 
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you can dig out the ground next to the slabs. Perhaps you are in a heavy clay soil that does not drain well. If you dig out the clay to, say, a foot, and refill with clean stones, brick rubble, the water will run into it and, with luck, eventually permeate into the soil. you can hammer scrap timber into the bottom of the trench, in time it will rot away and leave holes

it helps if you can grow some deep-rooting shrubs and vegetables nearby, the roots will, over time, penetrate into the ground and break up the clay. Try carrots and parnips in the spring, then maybe rhubard, peonies, dahlias, gladioli, all of which grow quite quickly with big roots and die back in winter. Not sure about shrubs, you need something that will not grow too big. If you mulch it with leaves or garden compost you will encourage worms, which also improve the soil

Cultivating a border next to the fence will also improve the porosity of the soil. Try to dig out the ground level so it is below the bottom of the fence.

Clay soil that is trampled, e.g. a grassy patch if you have children, gets very compressed and, if clay, impervious to water.

p.s.

@pidgeon1 is right about levelling the slabs, but I don't think that is the first thing to help drain away the water. You want the surrounding soil to be below the level of the slabs, and with a slight fall, so water will run off them
 
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you can dig out the ground next to the slabs. Perhaps you are in a heavy clay soil that does not drain well. If you dig out the clay to, say, a foot, and refill with clean stones, brick rubble, the water will run into it and, with luck, eventually permeate into the soil. you can hammer scrap timber into the bottom of the trench, in time it will rot away and leave holes

it helps if you can grow some deep-rooting shrubs and vegetables nearby, the roots will, over time, penetrate into the ground and break up the clay. Try carrots and parnips in the spring, then maybe rhubard, peonies, dahlias, gladioli, all of which grow quite quickly with big roots and die back in winter. Not sure about shrubs, you need something that will not grow too big. If you mulch it with leaves or garden compost you will encourage worms, which also improve the soil

Cultivating a border next to the fence will also improve the porosity of the soil. Try to dig out the ground level so it is below the bottom of the fence.

Clay soil that is trampled, e.g. a grassy patch if you have children, gets very compressed and, if clay, impervious to water.

p.s.

@pidgeon1 is right about levelling the slabs, but I don't think that is the first thing to help drain away the water. You want the surrounding soil to be below the level of the slabs, and with a slight fall, so water will run off them
A brilliant detailed response. This is what I expected to see in these forums. You sir are a legend. Thank you. I will definitely try everything you said out and hopefully that should sort it. Most People said to instead a soakaway ? Is that what you would recommend?
 
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yes, the trench I described is a mini soakaway, just for the paving problem. It is not a French Drain because it doesn't lead the water away. You can dig a bigger one if you want.
 
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Would a soakaway help ? Or would you not recommend it ?
yes, the trench I described is a mini soakaway, just for the paving problem. It is not a French Drain because it doesn't lead the water away. You can dig a bigger one if you want.
so basically we’re I have the decorative stones. Dig out a mini trench and fill it up and lay it back together and then should ideally sort out the issue of the drainage
 
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