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10mm too much

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by unionworkeruk, 2 May 2019.

  1. unionworkeruk

    unionworkeruk

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    I have one oak and one elm plank which I want to use for stair treads One is 35mm the other 30mm. thick. For the treads I need 25mm.

    They are about 240mm wide and 740 long.

    Could they practically be planed or sawn down ? Maybe a timber yard could do it ?

    Not being a professional carpenter I am guessing. Maybe I could saw them in a B&D and then finish with a sander ? I am in need of a bit off advice.
     
  2. foxhole

    foxhole

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    I would keep them as is and adjust risers to accommodate.
     
  3. HERTSDRAINAGE2010

    HERTSDRAINAGE2010

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    Bring them to a joinery shop and they can put it through the thickness-er.

    Andy
     
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  4. Motman

    Motman

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    Stop using those technical equipment terms!
     
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  5. HERTSDRAINAGE2010

    HERTSDRAINAGE2010

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  6. unionworkeruk

    unionworkeruk

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    I am impressed. More so by Foxhole who has convinced me to use them as they are bark, thickness and all. The staircase will be a selection of British timber
     
  7. HERTSDRAINAGE2010

    HERTSDRAINAGE2010

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    Stay here long enough and you will be depressed!

    :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

    Andy
     
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  8. Chud

    Chud

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    Another option for flattening/planing them down is to use a router sled - Matt Cremona and the Wood Whisperer have good videos on youtube on doing this.
     
  9. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Just be aware that the going on a stair has to be consistent (construction regs). That normally means that the front edges of the treads need to be straight, although we did once get away with a flight where the nosings were gently radiused side to side (but at least they were consistent) - and that hit and miss (or space saver) stairs are also sometimes granted an exemption. Having wany edges on the nosing side will therefore probably be unacceptable to the BCO (who may well need to be informed as replacement stairs which are not a direct like-for-like replacement, or are not an improvement from a non-regs stair to a current regs stair, are notifiable AFAIK) and also to your insurers (as they are non-compliant to the regs). Personally I wouldn't place my trust in a waney edge tread, regardless of how good it looks, because you cannot guaranteed that it will stay attached to the timber forever
     
    Last edited: 4 May 2019
  10. unionworkeruk

    unionworkeruk

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    The old stairs are dangerous with 1/2" treads that bow dangerously in the centre when walked on. The only centre support is screwed into the top tread and bottom one !

    The replacements will be 1 1/4" thick with two steel stringers at 3" from the ends of the tread. The bark is about 1/4 of an inch of a 9" plus board which will all be adjusted by chiseling the backs so they wrap around the stringers to make the fronts uniform and bolted into the frame. All loose bark has either been taken off or superglued back on.

    Shouldnt have any problems with that
     
  11. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Providing that the bark isn't at the front of the treads and that the treads are full width before adding the thickness of then bark then possibly
     
  12. unionworkeruk

    unionworkeruk

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    All treads will be at 10 inches and if the boards are wider at one end I will chisel a channel equal to the support and move it back until it is at a level 10" from the front to the support. The bark will be removed at the front but the rough darker edge will stay. I just will not plane them as I want them to look like parts of a tree and not squared off.

    It will take a lot longer but hopefully I will have a good selection of different types of wood on show These are Elm and Ash and I have Yew, Oak and Olive Ash to follow next week. I have a month to find the rest at the measurement I need or I will simply use pine until I replace them.
     

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