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2.4 & 5 settings on my router question.

Discussion in 'Home Automation' started by Motman, 13 Jul 2019.

  1. Motman

    Motman

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    As above, why have I got two connections on my WiFi when I search for a connection. Is one better than the other?
     
  2. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    One is 2.4 GHz channel frequency and the other is 5 GHz channel frequency for th wireless links to your WiFi enabled items.

    Neither is better overall then the other, which is used depends on the channels the WiFi enabled items can use to communicate with the router
     
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  3. wgt52

    wgt52

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    You will get less interference on the 5GHz channel than on the 2.4GHz one. That will mean you should have a more reliable connection although the range isn't as great. Search on the web for more detail.
     
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  4. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    I use the 5Ghz port for items which will stay local to the router, like a Firestick close to my 2nd router, a weather station close to my first router, then 2.4Ghz I use for more portable equipment.
     
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  5. mrStat

    mrStat

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    The 5Ghz channel has more bandwidth which means it can transfer more data at once. It will be faster than the 2.4Ghz.

    However due to the size of the wavelength it gets cut easier by your home’s construction and does not travel as far.
     
  6. festive

    festive

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    I think most people here summed it up pretty well especially the last from mrStat.

    The reason we have a split 2.4 and 5 is for legacy and future. Older devices may not have 5gig so we made them available with the older wifi standard on 2.4. The higher the frequency the faster they talk but the trade off is the more you need additional wifi points or a mesh as the higher frequencies cannot travel well through walls. So make sure you default to the 5gig connection unless its an older device which may fail and work on 2.4 only.

    Some toilet reading here on further detail.

    https://gizmodo.com/why-your-router-has-two-wifi-channels-and-how-they-work-1828650288
     
  7. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Some routers run both signals together but are best separate, your isp should have details on how to make the two frequency show separately ( if they don’t already ).
     
  8. SimonH2

    SimonH2

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    IME, if the router or access point isn't rubbish then separating the networks isn't worth while - better to just have one network and let the devices sort themselves out, which all modern ones will.
    However, some routers are "rubbish" (in more ways than just WiFi handling) - yes Plusnet, your Hub One really does have some WiFi issues. I actually use a Ubiquiti Unifi AC LR device and have turned off the WiFi in the router. Ditching the WiFi in the router has taken me from many cases of connection problems to rock solid, better range (works great at the end of the garden), rarely any connection issues.
     
  9. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    I'm on Plusnet using 2x routers each for 2.4 and 5Ghz. Main loft router (BT) connects to FTTC at full speed, then LAN down to second router (Netgear) on ground floor. Landline comes in from pole, direct to the loft. I have OPENwrt installed in the BT router and everything is rock steady, including access at far end of back garden 50 yards away.

    I never loose Wifi connection and I have around 8 devices able to use it. The only issue with WiFi has been with an IP cam, which would keep dropping the connection and I never managed to fix that - it even dropped it right next to a router. That now has a direct LAN connection and is fine.
     
  10. MilkDawg

    MilkDawg

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    For what it's worth, I have run both separate SSIDs for both and single SSID for both. I prefer having only 1 SSID with both assigned to that. Unifi kit seems to handle it fine and so do all the clients I connect. Unifi sets it up this way by default too.
     
  11. wizbongre

    wizbongre

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    I'd recommend having one common SSID for both 2.4 and 5 networks, and if you can, enable and configure band steering - this attempts to force devices capable of using 5Ghz onto that band, and those that can't default on to the 2.4Ghz band. This helps to ensure those devices that can take advantage of 5Ghz do.
     
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