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Alternative to Expanding Foam?

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by howardino, 16 Dec 2017.

  1. howardino

    howardino

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    I was just about to buy expanding foam - when reading on the back it said - this can cause cancer! then reading on the internet - it has been deemed toxic - even if they say it's only at the point of application or if the can isn't shaken well etc - why take the risk! is there a non-toxic alternative?

    Basically back upvc door is somewhat loose and can see a finger width gap externally and smaller gap internally - so door shakes when closing.

    Trying to figure what to fill the gap with - can feel quite a bit of cold air coming through!

    Any help and guidance very much appreciated.

    The screws seem to have quite a bit of movement into the brick work - is there a way to tighten this up?

    Thanks,
     
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  3. Mr Chibs

    Mr Chibs

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    Do you eat bacon, as this gives you cancer too...:eek:

    Thanks for the heads up, I'll read the back of the cans tomorrow.
     
  4. Fill it with cement, as you want a solid result. Foam will fill the gap, but not provide any stability.

    And as I always tell people, life is a terminal disease, so don't worry about what will kill you, only how well you live your life.
     
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  5. howardino

    howardino

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    Thanks Doggit! - sound advice there mate!- think that is the probably the best way to go - good take on life too!
     
  6. pilsbury

    pilsbury

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    Won’t this just crack and fall out with the vibration when the door opens and closes?
     
  7. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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    WTF???????? Just use expanding foam, what the **** are you all going on about FFS!

    Cement! :rolleyes:
     
  8. If it was a window Freddie, I'd agree with you completely; but as the door shakes when closing, although the foam can go off quite solidly, I reckon it won't provide enough stability over a long period.
     
  9. opps

    opps

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    Expanding foam contains isocyanates.

    The HSE claim that there have been reports of isocyanates triggering asthma in people that have never shown any signs of having asthma. However,I believe that the (seemingly very limited) cases involved people spraying 2 pack paints and according being exposed to much higher levels.

    I would imagine that your commute to work exposes you to a higher degree of dangerous
    pollutants than using a tin of expanding foam.

    And don't forget that cement can contribute to lung cancer too.

    Pretty much everything is dangerous, in many cases it boils down to the extent of your exposure to the item/risk.

    I don't want to make light of your concerns but you are going to hard pressed to find a truly "safe" alternative.
     
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  11. howardino

    howardino

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    Thanks, I'm not one to dismiss things on a whim - I use a mobile phone - we've all heard the stories around that. I had walked into wickes, picked up a can of expanding foam - happened to read the back of the can - whether it's suitable to use this time of year - and there it was - a warning about cancer! I've never seen anything like that before. Given I lost an uncle to Cancer last year - who was fit and healthy - I was like is it worth taking the risk.
    From what I understand the risk comes from breathing in the fumes on application and upto 24hrs until the gas becomes inert - or if the contents don't mix properly.
    Also if the stuff catches fire it can give off noxious carcinogenic gasses - but like anything else that can catch fire.

    Above aside, the back door is quite loose hinge side - so much that you can push it and it moves, bigger gap externally, inside prob 5mm gap vertically top to halfway. Screws are spinning freely and can see quite big gaps where the screws fix into the brickwork.

    Ideally looking for the best solution to provide the strength and stability to keep the door solid and keep the cold out!
     
  12. Keithmac

    Keithmac

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    When they fitted our windows they packed them then drilled through the frame and packers/ shims.

    Finally silicone sealead the outside and trims on the inside.

    Maybe pack where it's loose and another foxing or two?.
     
  13. opps

    opps

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    Prompted by your post, I started looking into the flammability of PU Foam and came across this warning from the west yorkshire fire brigade-

    Expanding foam is used in DIY to fix and fill holes and gaps. The propellant gas used to dispense the foam (methylene-diphenyl-diisocyanate 4,4) is highly flammable. The gas is emitted from the foam as it expands and dries out. It is heavier than air, sinks and forms an invisible cloud. If an ignition source is present, the gas can catch fire, potentially with explosive force.

    "In a more serious incident in London in February, a man reported that he was lucky to be alive after his arm was engulfed in a ball of flames after he used eight cans of expanding foam to plug mice holes under his kitchen units, unwittingly filling his flat with flammable propellant. He was left with second-degree burns."

    Their advice-

    • Rooms should be very well ventilated when applying the foam, especially when it’s being applied in confined spaces. The ventilation should continue while the foam is curing and hardening.

    • Ensure there are no naked flames, such as candles, gas cookers or gas fires in use when the foam is being applied and when it’s curing.
     
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  14. God

    God

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    I think you are being a bit over cautious. There are loads of things that can kill you and your worried about fitting a window with foam. Get someone else to fit it.
     
  15. Now you leave him alone God; yes he may well be overcautious, but without his concerns, the rest of us wouldn't get warned about what's in the cans we don't bother to read.

    You should be thanking him for being such a worryier.
     
  16. big-all

    big-all

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    there are about 66million people in the uk so any less than than 100 thousand incidents are fairly pointless to the odd person with casual contact
    you are more likely to win the lottery without ever buying a ticket than most off these random things happening so enjoy life and concentrate on actual situations that may effect your life :D
     
  17. DIYnot Local

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