Asbestos in 1920-30s Bungalow

Discussion in 'Building' started by AdamM2012, 13 Aug 2014.

  1. AdamM2012

    AdamM2012

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    Hello,

    We recently bought a detached bungalow that was built in the 1920-30s.

    According to a neighbour, they think that these bungalows were originally timber framed with asbestos paneling. They say that in the 80s, the owners of our bungalow bricked round the original bungalow and added a new roof.

    Our concern is whether or not asbestos sheeting still remains, as the place needs redecorating and we're not sure what is underneath the wallpaper.

    I managed to get into a cavity near the fireplace and take a couple of photos which I've included below. These show the rear of one of the interior walls.

    Does anyone know from just looking at it, what this material would be?

    Thanks for your help.

     
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  3. footprints

    footprints

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    Sorry to say so but it looks very much like asbestos AC (asbestos cement) sheeting.
    Only good thing is if it is AC that's much less of a concern than AIB (asbestos insulation board) but still a right pain if the whole place is sheathed in it!

    Did your survey pick up it was of non standard construction?
     
  4. AdamM2012

    AdamM2012

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    Unfortunately, we didn't get a full survey due to time constraints.

    It appears that some previous owners bricked round the original structure with single bricks, so it looks just like a normal bungalow from outside. We just don't know if they remove the asbestos cement boards whilst doing so.
     
  5. AdamM2012

    AdamM2012

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    Further to this, I did read that asbestos was only commonly used in the 1950s onwards, where as our bungalow is from the 1920-30s. I don't know if this would be good news?
     
  6. footprints

    footprints

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    Asbestos was commonly available pre war it's just that most properties were built by standard means so asbestos was not needed except perhaps for garages.

    True it's use increased greatly after the war no doubt due to production being ramped up to supply war needs. The post war Prefabs were totally built of asbestos.

    The only answer is to get an expert in to sample it. To take one sample and test it will be in the region of £100 plus another £20 or so each additional sample requested to be taken.

    http://www.arca.org.uk/

    Hope it goes well for you I reckon you have been stitched up as the last owner knew that any work on the fabric would disturb it, but unless asked they were not obliged to reveal it.
     
  7. AdamM2012

    AdamM2012

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    Just to give an update, we had an asbestos survey carried out a few months back and the results were that the only asbestos left in the property (other than the roof tiles) was above the ceilings throughout. The ceilings themselves are plasterboard, but these have been attached to asbestos cement sheets. The advice was to leave them alone and they should be fine. We have also found out from the council that the bungalow had asbestos cement sheeting all round the outside walls, but these were moved in the early 90s and and "replaced with a brick skin off new foundations".

    We had to take down some plasterboard in one room that had got damp. I've attached a photo which shows what was behind it. Behind the damp proof sheet is the brick wall skin. I've also shown a photo that is from underneath the floor of the same room.

    Does anyone know of any precautions we should take living in a place of this construction? I am assuming one of the main things is to try and keep the frame dry but we are a bit worried that due to it being built in the 1920s, it may not have been designed to last this long. There has been quite a bit of damp around the place that we have been fighting with a combination of ventilation, heating and a dehumidifier. We love the place and want to stay here for many years, so we want to try and stop it from collapsing!

     
  8. jeds

    jeds

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    The dampness in those walls is due to condensation. Include a vapour barrier between the insulation and new plasterboard. 1000g polythene will do it with taped joints and sealed edges.
     
  9. DIYnot Local

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