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Badly fitting kitchen sink - What can I do?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by richie4236, 28 Mar 2021.

  1. richie4236

    richie4236

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Gloucestershire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    A while ago the tap on our kitchen sink broke. I decided to take the opportunity to change out the whole sink, which was grotty and old. So, I removed the waste pipes, cut the feeds, and installed iso valves. So far so good. I knew there wasn't going to be a lot of overlap with the countertop when I measured the old sink. The hole had been cut rather large for some reason. The new one fits..... just. The problem is with the claws that hold the sink in place by biting into the underside of the countertop. The sink shipped with eight claws and the sink has about 12 points at which they can be fitted. Because of the positioning of brackets and other parts of the cupboard, but mostly because of the over-large hole, it's impossible to get a good purchase the clamps and so the new sink isn't very secure.
    I can think of a couple of options. I can screw horizontally through the fixing rail on the sink and into the countertop. This does not fill me with joy as the screws would be very close to the surface. Or - and this fills me with even less joy - I could glue the sink in place.
    Before I start bodging it, can anyone offer me a different option? We're planning to replace the kitchen at some point, so this isn't a "forever" fix. The kitchen's already quite tatty. All options considered. :)
     
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  3. Madrab

    Madrab

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    Location:
    East Renfrewshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    It has been known where cupboards and tops are cut so badly by the fitters that there is little or no worktop overhang to secure the sink clamps onto. Then it's usually down to using silicone and then use heavy weights (I've used low volt transformers and tool boxes in the past) to hold the sink down until the silicone cures.
     
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