Bathroom extraction devices

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Hass, 25 Jan 2010.

  1. Hass

    Hass

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    firstly, apologies if this is the wrong forum, I can't seem to find one for bathrooms??

    my bathroom does not have an extractor, windows alone are not enough to stop the moisture build up as you can imagine.

    I have the window, then the bath long length against the wall, there is a partition wall full height which is the shower cubicle on the other side. approx 3 metres length in full.

    The loft is directly above.

    Instead of having a (trubnie type not axial I think) fan direct on the window wall, is it better to have it in the top of the shower cubicle and then feed the ducting up into the loft and then somehow outthrough the eaves maybe?

    I was wondering if I should use fixed rigid plastic trunking in the loft if I do? will this give problems in the loft?
    I am looking at insulating the loft space soon with the full height recommendation.

    The other alternative is to mount the fan in the shower and run fixed plastic ducting (flat rectangular shaped) along the top of the wall to the wall beside the window. Obviously not the best aesthetic look.

    the walls are cavity and its regular brick on the outside but not sure about inside. Would you need a diamond core type drill to go right thorugh?

    cheers guys, regards
     
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  3. stem

    stem

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    This is a fairly standard method of installation, make sure that the duct slopes downward slightly towards the outlet so that any condensation formed in the duct runs outside. Insulating the duct from the cold loft air will also help reduce condensation in it.

    It is usual to site the extraction point in the bathroom close to the point where the steam is generated, but it is also good, if possible to arrange it, such that the air that comes into replace what's extracted is drawn in at the opposite side of the room. If the extraction point is right next to the door or an open window, the replacement air will come in there and be out through the fan without covering the rest of the room.

    This would be OK if installed as above.

    Yuk, :eek:

    You can buy/borrow/hire a core drill that will make you a perfect hole in one go, otherwise a series of smaller holes drilled with a normal masonry drill and chisseled through is OK if you take your time. The duct must pass right through and bridge the cavity so no moist air escapes into it.
     
  4. Nige F

    Nige F

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    That`s the way to go - most soffits are wide enough for an outlet and that flat trunking will just go through eaves with rafter feet ( did @ my last house):idea:
     
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