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Best stopcock/tap packing gland solution?

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by dogfonos, 11 Oct 2019.

  1. dogfonos

    dogfonos

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    Appreciate views and opinions on the following simple problem...

    Whatever gland seal packing solution I try, none last a year. I've used: string+candle wax, nylon cord+vasoline, PTFE tape, string+PTFE tape and thin rubber strip+silicon grease (not all at the same time!).

    The tap shaft is de-chalked, clean and in decent condition (no deep scratches) and the water is low pressure too, so what am I doing wrong? Suggestions gratefully received. Thanks.
     
  2. The Novice

    The Novice

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    Could try loctite 55, haven't used it myself, but loads rave about it. Tell us your method, could be wrapping it wrong?
     
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  3. JohnD

    JohnD

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    photo please

    do you take gland nut right off?
     
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  4. Madrab

    Madrab

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    Try a new tap .... the gland is invariably brass on brass and once it wears then it's worn

    Tape, thread etc is only a temp fix and will only last a certain number of uses before it starts to pass again.
     
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  5. dogfonos

    dogfonos

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    Oh yes. Handle and gland nut removed. I removed the entire tap body from the valve seat housing so I could de-chalk and clean thoroughly.

    I wrap the coated string/cord in a spiral direction around the shaft (clockwise - as looking from handle end) and push it down carefully with a small screwdriver. I use sufficient so that the gland nut, when replaced, starts to tighten at about two complete revolutions.

    True. It's old and likely a bit worn. What method of gland sealing would a new tap use?

    Since I posted earlier, I had a rummage about in the garage and found a set of rubber (or EPDM) O-rings so I've removed existing gland packing (my nylon cord+vasoline) and inserted a couple of suitably sized O-rings, smeared with silicon grease. Needed hardly any tightening to seal so fingers crossed - hence no photo available.
     
  6. JohnD

    JohnD

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    When you tried PTFE tape, how did you fit it?

    How often are you operating this stopcock?

    Is it the one in the ground, or the one under the sink?

    We still want photos.
     
  7. kidgreen61

    kidgreen61

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    Never failed to repair one yet with PTFE
     
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  8. Madrab

    Madrab

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    New stop taps normally use a nylon seal within the gland.

    The old ones use to be a ball on the shank of the tap and a well on the inside of the tap body and the nut that the ball sits in. They wear and dont seal anymore. The tap/thread bridges the wear gap but if its being used now and again, that all stop taps should be just to stop them seizing up, wahtever is used eventualy starts to let by again, it's only a temp fix.

    How long has it been there & what does it owe you? I'd replace it for a full bore lever valve.
     
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  9. dogfonos

    dogfonos

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    The PTFE tape I have is the common very thin tape form that is usually used to make threaded joints water-tight. When I used PTFE tape on its own, I pulled off a long section and twisted it into a sort of thin string but it needed lots to fill the gland seal gap and it didn't last long either.

    It's quite possible I'm using incorrect terminology. The tap in question is a very old (possibly 1960's?) shower tap which is part concealed in a wall just above the bath. To my eyes, it looks like a chromed version of a typical brass modern stopcock (though I imagine the size is slightly larger, it has a covering chromed 'cap' and I doubt the threads are metric - but I haven't checked). The tap is used three or four times a day. I don't want to spend too much time on this issue because the whole plumbing setup will be changed next year when I have the bathroom replaced. Ideally, I'm after a quick fix that would last about a year.

    It may be that the rubber or EPDM 'O'-rings I've fitted will be good enough so I won't touch anything unless these seals fail. P1010999.JPG P1010996.JPG

    Are you talking about PTFE in the string form rather than wafer thin tape used for threaded joint sealing? Maybe like the Loctite 55 mentioned in post#2?
     
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