Bird table - painted wood

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by kipper1066, 9 May 2017.

  1. kipper1066

    kipper1066

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    I am about to build a large bird table for my garden, and I would like it to be painted rather than left natural.

    I will use exterior paint, but I want to ensure the wood doesn’t rot and the paint doesn’t discolour or flake.

    Can anyone advise me whether I should use pre-treated wood, or would plain untreated wood be fine? Also, should I use any kind of undercoat?

    Many thanks, and any other top tips much appreciated.
     
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  3. Workers99

    Workers99

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    I would recommend you use treated wood even if you are going to paint it.
     
  4. kipper1066

    kipper1066

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    Thanks for your reply. I wasn't sure if it was okay to paint over tanalised wood - i.e. I didn't know if it would react badly.

    Thanks again.
     
  5. Nozzle

    Nozzle

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    You can't used water based paint if it's tanalised. Not unless you leave it outside to weather for a season (and then what is the point in buying tanalised) I had this same conundrum when decided what would to buy when re-doing my workshop. In the end, I opted for untreated boarding with a high quality, sprayable, water based paint with suitable knotting. Bedec is good paint.

    Nozzle
     
  6. kipper1066

    kipper1066

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    Oh right, thanks, Nozzle.

    Maybe untreated wood that is primed and painted with good quality outdoor wood would be best then.
     
  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    you wouldn't consider a breathing shed-and-fence treatment? Garden wood can get very wet, then baked dry, so paint tends to crack and blister, sometimes peel.
     
  8. kipper1066

    kipper1066

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    I know what you mean. JohnD, but this is the sort of thing I'm hoping to achieve... (see attached image)
     

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  10. JohnD

    JohnD

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    If it was me, I'd use oil-based Aluminium Wood Primer (it is grey, not silver)

    It's the most durable primer I know, it also seals knots.

    For cut edges, soak in Cuprinol Clear wood preserver and allow to dry fully before painting.
     
  11. kipper1066

    kipper1066

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    Thanks, JohnD. So do you think Aluminium Wood Primer on plain or tanalised wood?
     
  12. JohnD

    JohnD

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    In the garden, I would always prefer treated wood, and like to soak the ends. I believe Tanalised is an empty-cell pressure treatment. I don't think I've ever painted any, though I have used fence stains and decking stains (which seem to be better). Water can get in through knots and shakes, and rot it from the inside.

    You can paint over Cuprinol Clear, once it's dried, it's a solvent based preserver mostly used indoors as it has no water-repellents, so doesn't need weathering. I've used it with Aluminium Primer and found it very durable.

    I sometimes go to a woodyard that has remnants from boat-builders, and have been lucky enough to get bits of teak for important outside work. Recently I've been using linseed oil on outdoor joinery. It is not damp-proof.
     
    Last edited: 9 May 2017
  13. kipper1066

    kipper1066

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    Thanks John. That's very helpful.

    Now I just need to build the damn thing.
     
  14. Nige F

    Nige F

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    I use Sadolin Superdec 2 coats onto bare wood - job done;)
     
  15. kipper1066

    kipper1066

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    Thanks Nige. I've Googled Sadolin Superdec and it looks like the best/easiest option.

    Many thanks for your advice.
     
  16. DIYnot Local

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