Boiler - how much water produced to soakaway?

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I'm getting a new condensing boiler. Its not really practical to route the drain from the boiler to the main waste pipe in the kitchen. A soakaway has been suggested, but I am not so sure.

1. How much water will the boiler produce that requires drainage?

2. How far should a soakaway be from the house and how should it be constructed?

3. What about collecting the water in a water butt for garden use?
 
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A larger condensing boiler in optimum operation can produce more than 1 litre per hour. In normal use they give a bucket every 3-4 days.

There are guide designs available for soakaways which should ideally be at least 2 m from the house.

The acidity of the water would not be advisable for garden use.

Tony
 
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You can not use the water on the garden. It is acidic, and nopt the kind Rhododendrons like either.

The amount depends on boiler, output, use, heat load etc., but it will be a couple of litres a day.

The soakaway needs to be filled with lime chippings and around 400mm deep 200 diameter and between one and three metres from the building
 
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Actually Dan they DO require an acid soil so the condensate could be used to water them! Not much else in the garden does though!



Rhododendrons

Rhododendrons vary in size from knee-high dwarf forms to varieties that reach 4.5m (15ft) tall. It is therefore essential to choose one to suit the space you have available. They like a sheltered, lightly shaded position and are fussy about the soil conditions - requiring an acid soil that is neither too wet or too dry. So if your's is not suitable you would be better off growing them in containers or a raised bed filled with ericaceous compost.
 
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Simpler to plumb into existing drainage if at all possible.
MW
 
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They're all done like this is SE London - yet to come across a steamer with legal and correct condense pipework :(

 
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:eek:
I guess the local thugs have got to fill their acid bottles somewhere :LOL:
MW
 
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The MacAlpine condensate traps I fit recommend a minimum of 500mm from the foundations and that the exit holes are pointing away from the foundations.

I thought that it would be a lot more than 2 litres/day though :oops:

You could always fit a 'condensafe' in the pipe work to protect your Petunias ;)
 
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gas4you said:
The MacAlpine condensate traps I fit recommend a minimum of 500mm from the foundations and that the exit holes are pointing away from the foundations.

I thought that it would be a lot more than 2 litres/day though :oops:

You could always fit a 'condensafe' in the pipe work to protect your Petunias ;)


exactly and can be buried so the only thing the first pic proves is that the condensate hasnt been lagged, why post pictures on here so customers will look at a job and think their plumber has done a bad job because lets face it all the customer will see from that pic is the way it's been piped, most couln't tell the difference between a lagged pipe and a plastic overflow.
 
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Good point now you mention it. The last MacAlpine soakaway I fitted was 500mm away and buried yet the pipework to it looked like that in the pic :rolleyes:
 
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