Cast Iron Soil Stacks

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Is it possible to break into a cast iron soil stack to add a branch to a new location for a toilet. I was hoping to hacksaw into the pipe and use a plastic branch and connect the new toilet using plastic 110mm pipe.
Is this a bad idea ?
 
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Just about anything is possible these days, someone will produce an appropriate plastic-cast iron coupling or even a T fitting (at a price), it wont look very nice though.

If there is nothing going into the pipe it might be a vent stack and the radius of the underground swept bend that connects it into the drains might not be appropriate for a soil stack.

Is there an existing T fitting in the stack.
 
Cast iron is very difficult to cut, I'll be interested to hear how many blades you get through, and if it cracks before you finish.

I've never tried with an angle grinder, does that work?
 
I had a feeling that they might be very difficult to cut, and even thought about using my bro's arc welder to cut through it !

I wasnt clear on my original post, but the stack already has a toilet connected. It joins the current stack into what I suppose you would call a 'T' section.

Does anyone have experience of removing these sections ? Are the joints easy to break and what are they joined with ?
 
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The ones I've had were lead-solder. You can free them off with your propane torch, but re-fixing might be a lost art. I believe some people use rag and white.
 
What's wrong with a Timesaver branch?
All you've got to do is cut out the right length of cast iron (I use a mini angle grinder usually) position the rubber boots, clamp it all up and then join on a bit of 110mm plastic soil pipe and whatever else you need.

The only problems are gaining safe access (using a grinder on a ladder is NOT a good idea, especially when you're about to release a heavy chunk of cast iron) and getting all the angles right.

OK - you COULD use a plastic branch with CI adaptors above and below - but it'll look rubbsih.
 
Thanks chaps for all the replies. Better get myself down to the merchants to check out this timesaver stuff !
 
JohnD said:
The ones I've had were lead-solder. You can free them off with your propane torch, but re-fixing might be a lost art. I believe some people use rag and white.
Lost indeed :LOL: Not solder, molten lead, offcuts from the flashings.........been, done T shirt....old fart :LOL:
 
I've got some chaulking tools I bought off some old plumber guy but I've never used them,

are you supposed to pack the lead in solid state or melt and pour in?
 
mcmarshon, i'm posting a new post "replacing and cutting into soil stacks"
here on the plumbing forum, perhaps it would interest you.
 
Brumylad..Before the introduction of Titan and bolted glands we used to lead caulk cast iron water mains.
Thes had to be done horizontally of course and the procedure was to first of all caulk tarred hemp rope in to the joint using the lead caulking tools you have bought.
Always a small cauldron of ordinary lead over a gas flame was in use.
To prevent the lead pouring out of the bottom of the joint we used an asbestos rope about one thick looped around the joint held there by a strong alligator type clip with a small gap at the top to pour into.
Although in the real olden days they used clay for the above task.
The lead was then poured in using a ladle
The rope was removed and then the caulking tools were used to hammer the lead further into the joint.
The one danger was water in the joint when the lead was poured. Just a small amount and the lead flew everywhere like a shotgun.
Made a remarkably good joint and some of the old cast pipe jointed like this is still in use after a couple of hundred years or more.
Vertical cast done like this would be much easier as the molten lead can't escape.
wemyss
 
mnb said:
mcmarshon, i'm posting a new post "replacing and cutting into soil stacks"
here on the plumbing forum, perhaps it would interest you.

Hi mnb, with bated breath looked for your post, but cant see it ?
 

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