Chainsaw to remove Leylandii

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I have a bank with a double row of Leylandii .... probably around 60m long.
I took out the front row 2 years ago and planted a much nicer Cotoneaster hedge.

I now want to thin out the row behind (using as privacy while new hedge establishes) .... the trees are typ 4 - 6" trunks, probably 10m tall. I can't fell them and let fall towards the new hedge (or the house) There is a nice drop down a bank behind them, but if I just saw through them they will hang ... held up by the surrounding close packed trees.

I need to spear cut them, so they just drop vertically ..... thinking of spear cutting at around 4' so I don't work above shoulder height ... then once it drops keep spear cutting and side branch trimming until I can get tree pulled down bank by a rope.


Just a question for those who have expertise on chainsaw .... for such spear cutting do I juts cut downwards from above .. or do |I need to make an undercut & vee notch first, then cut through from above.
 
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I know that I have never learned a textbook way and would guess there may not be one as it sounds inherently dangerous and would be ruled out in favour of a safer but more laborious and expensive method.
But I have played about with the method.
I don't know of any undercutting aspect as it's not like a step cut at all.


Above link shows the basic method as I knew it though we used to cut as video with bar almost completely vertical to at least 50% then before the tree realises and starts to tip, (which should be opening up the cut if you have chosen the cut position with lean or wind in mind) then bring the saw up to the highest point in the cut and level the saw. You should then be driving the saw down ideally with a small fraction of the bar doing the cutting ( meaning fast cut) and plough through and down.
Obviously the higher the better as thinner higher up. But more dangerous...

Danger.

Best just to practice small and work up.

Key was to ensure you chose the right place to start in terms of lean. Wrong would close the cut and bind the saw. Opposite wrong would open up the cut too soon. Best would be using a little bit of lean to keep kerf open until you had taken all the wood out with cut position 1 and then change to horizontal cut 2

Pretty sure it's a very dangerous thing to do with a 30' tree though hard to visualise.

And you of course want it very sharp, and a seriously overpowered saw.

Maybe video it...? If you must do it at all...
 
That is what I want to do .. though they won't fall backwards .. the branches of Leylandii all intertwined so hold each other up.
 
Yeah now I remember. Lombardi poplars were good for that, but from a harness, you could spear branches down and sometimes they'd rattle all the way down through the canopy and end up so deep you fell them again on the ground.
Stihl 064 with a daft short bar on it would scream through a spear cut very well. Pics! Films!
 
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"though they won't fall backwards" these may be words you will want to forget ever saying...
They might fall backwards.... :)
 
That is what I want to do .. though they won't fall backwards .. the branches of Leylandii all intertwined so hold each other up.
Cut and put a rope around bottom to drag out of the line .
 
Dismantle the tree from the top branch by branch. Then cut the trunks into short sections from the top down.

Or the best and most sensible method....... Employ a reputable firm of tree surgeons to remove the trees in a safe professional way
 
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Or the best and most sensible method....... Employ a reputable firm of tree surgeons to remove the trees in a safe professional way

I'm sure it is ...... but this is DIY site. Plus I want to thin out bit by bit ...... too expensive to keep calling them back
 
Cut and put a rope around bottom to drag out of the line .

This is what we did when I took the first half dozen out ..... had my son at bottom of bank pulling then down bank with a rope once felled. My concern is likely hood of them falling forwards and damaging new hedge. Thought about using a ladder - not to climb but a prop against the tree to prevent it falling sideways.
 

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